The marketisation of public employment and public services and its impact on civil servants and citizens

TitreThe marketisation of public employment and public services and its impact on civil servants and citizens
Type de publicationBook Chapter
Year of Publication2019
AuteursBonvin, J-M
ÉditeurSerrano-Pascual, A, Jepsen, M
Book TitleThe deconstruction of employment as a political question: employment as a floating signifier
Pagination199–219
PublisherPalgrave
Place PublishedLondon, UK
ISBN Number978-3-319-93617-8
URLhttps://www.palgrave.com/gp/book/9783319936161

Healthy minds 0–100 years: Optimising the use of European brain imaging cohorts (“Lifebrain”)

TitreHealthy minds 0–100 years: Optimising the use of European brain imaging cohorts (“Lifebrain”)
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuteursWalhovd, KB, Fjell, AM, Westerhausen, R, Nyberg, L, Ebmeier, KP, Lindenberger, U, Bartrés-Faz, D, Baaré, WFC, Siebner, HR, Henson, R, Drevon, CA, Penninx, BWJH, Ghisletta, P, Rogeberg, O, Tyler, L, Bertram, L, Knudsen, GPeggy Stro, Ljeosne, IBudin
JournalEuropean Psychiatry
Volume50
Pagination47–56
ISSN0924 9338
Mots-clésDementia, Economics and psychiatry, Epidemiology, MRI, Neurodevelopment, Psychiatric disorder
Résumé

The main objective of "Lifebrain" is to identify the determinants of brain, cognitive and mental (BCM) health at different stages of life. By integrating, harmonising and enriching major European neuroimaging studies across the life span, we will merge fine-grained BCM health measures of more than 5000 individuals. Longitudinal brain imaging, genetic and health data are available for a major part, as well as cognitive and mental health measures for the broader cohorts, exceeding 27,000 examinations in total. By linking these data to other databases and biobanks, including birth registries, national and regional archives, and by enriching them with a new online data collection and novel measures, we will address the risk factors and protective factors of BCM health. We will identify pathways through which risk and protective factors work and their moderators. Exploiting existing European infrastructures and initiatives, we hope to make major conceptual, methodological and analytical contributions towards large integrative cohorts and their efficient exploitation. We will thus provide novel information on BCM health maintenance, as well as the onset and course of BCM disorders. This will lay a foundation for earlier diagnosis of brain disorders, aberrant development and decline of BCM health, and translate into future preventive and therapeutic strategies. Aiming to improve clinical practice and public health we will work with stakeholders and health authorities, and thus provide the evidence base for prevention and intervention.

URLhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0924933817330237
DOI10.1016/j.eurpsy.2017.12.006

Bootstrap validation of the estimated parameters in mixture models used for clustering

TitreBootstrap validation of the estimated parameters in mixture models used for clustering
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursTaushanov, Z, Berchtold, A
JournalJournal de la Société Française de Statistique
Volume160
Nombre1
Pagination114 – 129
ISSN2102-6238
Mots-clésbootstrap, clustering, confidence interval, frequentist estimation, HMTD model, label-switching, mixture model, uncertainty
Résumé

When a mixture model is used to perform clustering, the uncertainty is related both to the choice of an optimal model (including the number of clusters) and to the estimation of the parameters. We discuss here the computation of confidence intervals using different bootstrap approaches, which either mix or separate the two kinds of uncertainty. In particular, we suggest two new approaches that rely to some degree on the model specification considered as optimal by the researcher, and that address specifically the uncertainty related to parameter estimation. These methods are especially useful for poorly separated data or complex models, where the selected solution is difficult to recreate in each bootstrap sample, and they present the advantage of reducing the well-known label-switching issue. Two simulation experiments based on the Hidden Mixture Transition Distribution model for the clustering of longitudinal data illustrate our proposed bootstrap approaches.

URLhttp://journal-sfds.fr/article/view/730

Social resources as compensatory cognitive reserve? Interactions of social resources with education in predicting late-life cognition

TitreSocial resources as compensatory cognitive reserve? Interactions of social resources with education in predicting late-life cognition
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuteursWindsor, TD, Ghisletta, P, Gerstorf, D
JournalThe Journals of Gerontology: Series B
Mots-clésBerlin Aging Study (BASE), cognition, cognitive aging, cognitive reserve, social networks
Résumé

Objective: Access to social relationships has been linked with better cognitive performance. We examined whether social resources interact with education to predict cognitive outcomes, which could indicate that social resources fulfill a compensatory role in promoting cognitive reserve.
Method: We applied multilevel growth models to 6-wave, 13-year longitudinal data from the Berlin Aging Study (aged 70–103 years at first occasion; M = 84.9 years, 50% women) and have taken into account key individual difference factors, including sociodemographic variables, medically diagnosed comorbidities, and depressive symptoms. To account for possible reverse causality, analyses were conducted on a subset of the BASE participants without dementia (n = 368), and in follow-up analyses with the full sample (n = 516) using wave-specific longitudinal assessments of probable dementia status as a covariate.
Results: Larger networks were associated with better performance on tests of perceptual speed and verbal fluency, but did not interact with education, providing little support for a compensatory reserve hypothesis. An interaction of education with emotional loneliness emerged in the prediction of perceptual speed, suggesting that the educational divide in speed was minimal among people who reported lower levels of loneliness.
Discussion: We discuss our results in the context of differential implications of social resources for cognition and consider possible mechanisms underlying our findings.

URLhttps://academic.oup.com/psychsocgerontology/advance-article/doi/10.1093/geronb/gby143/5237787
DOI10.1093/geronb/gby143

Fluid intelligence predicts change in depressive symptoms in later life: The lothian birth cohort 1936

TitreFluid intelligence predicts change in depressive symptoms in later life: The lothian birth cohort 1936
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuteursAichele, S, Ghisletta, P, Corley, J, Pattie, A, Taylor, AM, Starr, JM, Deary, IJ
JournalPsychological Science
Volume29
Nombre12
Pagination1984–1995
ISSN0956-7976
Mots-clésdepression, dynamic, intelligence, lead-lag, Longitudinal Change
Résumé

We examined reciprocal, time-ordered associations between age-related changes in fluid intelligence and depressive symptoms. Participants were 1,091 community-dwelling older adults from the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936 study who were assessed repeatedly at 3-year intervals between the ages of 70 and 79 years. On average, fluid intelligence and depressive symptoms worsened with age. There was also a dynamic-coupling effect, in which low fluid intelligence at a given age predicted increasing depressive symptoms across the following 3-year interval, whereas the converse did not hold. Model comparisons showed that this coupling parameter significantly improved overall fit and had a correspondingly moderately strong effect size, accounting on average for an accumulated 0.9 standard-deviation increase in depressive symptoms, following lower cognitive performance, across the observed age range. Adjustment for sociodemographic and health-related covariates did not significantly attenuate this association. This implies that monitoring for cognitive decrements in later life may expedite interventions to reduce related increases in depression risk.

URLhttps://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0956797618804501
DOI10.1177/0956797618804501

Cardiovascular symptoms and longitudinal declines in processing speed differentially predict cerebral white matter lesions in older adults

TitreCardiovascular symptoms and longitudinal declines in processing speed differentially predict cerebral white matter lesions in older adults
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuteursAichele, S, Rabbitt, P, Ghisletta, P
JournalArchives of Gerontology and Geriatrics
Volume78
Pagination139–149
ISSN0167-4943
Mots-clésaging, cognitive decline, machine learning, Processing speed, Random forest analysis, White matter lesions
Résumé

It is well established that cerebral white matter lesions (WML), present in the majority of older adults, are associated with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases and also with cognitive decline. However, much less is known about how WML are related to other important individual characteristics and about the generality vs. brain region-specificity of WML. In a longitudinal study of 112 community-dwelling adults (age 50–71 years at study entry), we used a machine learning approach to evaluate the relative strength of 52 variables in association with WML burden. Variables included socio-demographic, lifestyle, and health indices—as well as multiple cognitive abilities (modeled as latent constructs using factor analysis)—repeatedly measured at three- to six-year intervals. Greater chronological age, symptoms of cardiovascular disease, and processing speed declines were most strongly linked to elevated WML burden (accounting for ∼49% of variability in WML). Whereas frontal lobe WML burden was associated both with elevated cardiovascular symptoms and declines in processing speed, temporal lobe WML burden was only significantly associated with declines in processing speed. These latter outcomes suggest that age-related WML-cognition associations may be etiologically heterogeneous across fronto-temporal cerebral regions.

URLhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29960180
DOI10.1016/j.archger.2018.06.010

Development of reserves over the life course and onset of vulnerability in later life

TitreDevelopment of reserves over the life course and onset of vulnerability in later life
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuteursCullati, S, Kliegel, M, Widmer, E
JournalNature Human Behaviour
Volume2
Nombre8
ISSN2397-3374
Résumé

This Review develops a theoretical framework for the development and onset of vulnerability in later life based on the concept of reserves. We stress the advantages of using the concept of reserves in interdisciplinary life-course studies, compared with related concepts such as resources and capital. We enrich the definition of vulnerability as a lack of reserves and a reduced capacity of an individual to restore reserves. Two dimensions of reserves, originating from lifespan psychology and gerontology, are of particular importance: their constitution and sustainability by behaviours and interaction with the environment (the ‘use it or lose it’ paradigm) and the presence of thresholds, below which functioning becomes highly challenging. This heuristic approach reveals the potential for a conceptualization of reserves and is exemplified in an empirical illustration. Further interdisciplinary research based on the concept is needed.

URLhttps://www.nature.com/articles/s41562-018-0395-3
DOI10.1038/s41562-018-0395-3

Holistic analysis of the life course: Methodological challenges and new perspectives

TitreHolistic analysis of the life course: Methodological challenges and new perspectives
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuteursPiccarreta, R, Studer, M
JournalAdvances in Life Course Research
ISSN1040-2608
Mots-clésCluster analysis, Mixed latent Markov models, multistate models, sequence analysis, trajectories
Résumé

We survey state-of-the-art approaches to study trajectories in their entirety, adopting a holistic perspective, and discuss their strengths and weaknesses. We begin by considering sequence analysis (SA), one of the most established holistic approaches. We discuss the inherent problems arising in SA, particularly in the study of the relationship between trajectories and covariates. We describe some recent developments combining SA and Event History Analysis, and illustrate how weakening the holistic perspective—focusing on sub-trajectories—might result in a more flexible analysis of life courses. We then move to some model-based approaches (included in the broad classes of multistate and of mixture latent Markov models) that further weaken the holistic perspective, assuming that the difficult task of predicting and explaining trajectories can be simplified by focusing on the collection of observed transitions. Our goal is twofold. On one hand, we aim to provide social scientists with indications for informed methodological choices and to emphasize issues that require consideration for proper application of the described approaches. On the other hand, by identifying relevant and open methodological challenges, we highlight and encourage promising directions for future research.

URLhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1040260818301849
DOI10.1016/j.alcr.2018.10.004
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Age differences in day-to-day speed-accuracy tradeoffs: Results from the COGITO study

TitreAge differences in day-to-day speed-accuracy tradeoffs: Results from the COGITO study
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuteursGhisletta, P, Joly-Burra, E, Aichele, S, Lindenberger, U, Schmiedek, F
JournalMultivariate Behavioral Research
Volume53
Nombre6
Pagination842–852
ISSN0027-3171
Mots-clésCOGITO, multilevel vector autoregressive model, reaction time, speed-accuracy tradeoff
Résumé

We examined adult age differences in day-to-day adjustments in speed-accuracy tradeoffs (SAT) on a figural comparison task. Data came from the COGITO study, with over 100 younger and 100 older adults, assessed for over 100 days. Participants were given explicit feedback about their completion time and accuracy each day after task completion. We applied a multivariate vector auto-regressive model of order 1 to the daily mean reaction time (RT) and daily accuracy scores together, within each age group. We expected that participants adjusted their SAT if the two cross-regressive parameters from RT (or accuracy) on day t-1 of accuracy (or RT) on day t were sizable and negative. We found that: (a) the temporal dependencies of both accuracy and RT were quite strong in both age groups; (b) younger adults showed an effect of their accuracy on day t-1 on their RT on day t, a pattern that was in accordance with adjustments of their SAT; (c) older adults did not appear to adjust their SAT; (d) these effects were partly associated with reliable individual differences within each age group. We discuss possible explanations for older adults’ reluctance to recalibrate speed and accuracy on a day-to-day basis.

URLhttps://doi.org/10.1080/00273171.2018.1463194
DOI10.1080/00273171.2018.1463194
Identifiant (ID) PubMed29683724

On the use of growth models to study normal cognitive aging

TitreOn the use of growth models to study normal cognitive aging
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursGhisletta, P, Mason, F, von Oertzen, T, Hertzog, C, Nilsson, L-G, Lindenberger, U
JournalInternational Journal of Behavioral Development
ISSN0165-0254
Mots-clésGrowth model, long-term change, longitudinal research designs, nonlinear mixed-effects models, normal cognitive aging
Résumé

Growth models (GM) of the mixed-effects and latent curve varieties have become popular methodological tools in lifespan research. One of the major advantages of GM is their flexibility in studying individual differences in change. We scrutinized the change functions of GM used in five years of publications on cognitive aging. Of the 162 publications that we identified, 88% test linear or quadratic polynomials, and fewer than 5% apply functions that are nonlinear in their parameters, such as exponential decline. This apparent bias in favor of polynomial decomposition calls for exploring what conclusions about individual differences in change are likely to be drawn if one applies linear or quadratic GMs to data simulated under a conceptually and empirically plausible model of exponential cognitive decline from adulthood to old age. Hence, we set up a simulation that manipulated the rate of exponential decline, measurement reliability, number of occasions, interval width, and sample size. True rate of decline and interval width influenced results strongly, number of occasions and measurement reliability exerted a moderate effect, and the effects of sample size appeared relatively minor. Critically, our results show that fit statistics generally do not differentiate misspecified linear or quadratic models from the true exponential model. Moreover, power to detect variance in change for the linear and quadratic GMs is low, and estimates of individual differences in level and change can be highly biased by model misspecification. We encourage researchers to also consider plausible nonlinear change functions when studying behavioral development across the lifespan.

URLhttps://doi.org/10.1177/0165025419851576
DOI10.1177/0165025419851576
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Illustrating instrumental variable regressions using the career adaptability – job satisfaction relationship

TitreIllustrating instrumental variable regressions using the career adaptability – job satisfaction relationship
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursBollmann, G, Rouzinov, S, Berchtold, A, Rossier, J
JournalFrontiers in Psychology
Volume10
ISSN1664-1078
Mots-clésAffect (emotion, career adaptability, causal inference, instrumental variable (IV), job satisfaction, mood, personality, personality)
Résumé

This article illustrates instrumental variable (IV) estimation by examining an unexpected finding of the research on career adaptability and job satisfaction. Theoretical and empirical arguments suggest that in the general population, people’s abilities to adapt their careers are beneficial to their job satisfaction. However, a recent meta-analysis unexpectedly found no effect when personality traits are controlled for. We argue that a reverse effect of job satisfaction on career adaptability, originating from affective tendencies tied to personality, might explain this null effect. Our argument implies that the estimates obtained with traditional ordinary least squares (OLS) regressions are biased by endogeneity, a correlation between an explanatory variable and the error term in a regression model. When experimental manipulations are impossible, IV estimations, such as two-stage least squares (2SLS) regressions, are one possible solution to the endogeneity problem. Analyzing three waves of data from a sample of 836 adults, the concurrent and time-lagged effect of job satisfaction on career adaptability was revealed to be more consistent than the reverse. Our results provide an explanation, rooted in affective dispositions, as to why recent meta-analytical estimates unexpectedly found that career adaptability does not predict job satisfaction at the interindividual level. We also discuss IV estimation in terms of its limits, weight the interpretation of its estimates against the temporality criterion for causal inference, and consider its possible extension to analyses of change.

URLhttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2019.01481/full
DOI10.3389/fpsyg.2019.01481

The LIVES-FORS cohort survey: A longitudinal diversified sample of young adults who have grown up in Switzerland

TitreThe LIVES-FORS cohort survey: A longitudinal diversified sample of young adults who have grown up in Switzerland
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursSpini, D, Morselli, D, Elcheroth, G, Gauthier, J-A, Le Goff, J-M, Dasoki, N, Tillmann, R, Rossignon, F
JournalLongitudinal and Life Course Studies
Volume10
Nombre3
Pagination399–410
ISSN1757-9597
URLhttps://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/bup/llcs/2019/00000010/00000003/art00007?crawler=true&mimetype=application/pdf
DOI10.1332/175795919X15628474680745

Crystallized and fluid intelligence

TitreCrystallized and fluid intelligence
Type de publicationBook
Year of Publication2018
Series EditorGhisletta, P, Lecerf, T
EditionOxford bibliographies in psychology
PublisherOxford University Press
Place PublishedNew York, USA
Résumé

The psychologist Raymond B. Cattell formulated the “hypothesis of fluid and crystallized abilities” in the 1940s, when standardized intelligence tests started being used frequently for selection and management purposes. While fluid intelligence reflects basic cognitive abilities, such as reasoning, which are independent of learning and experience, crystallized intelligence reflects the abilities to use cultural, educational, and vocational knowledge and experience to learn, partially by relying on one's fluid abilities, and subsequently solve problems. Two distinctive features of this account of intelligence are its explicit developmental predictions and its reliance on factor‐analytic techniques for empirical testing of its structure. Evidence stemming from neuropsychology and neurology also partially supports the distinction between fluid and crystallized abilities. Several tasks have been proposed to assess an individuals' crystallized intelligence (e.g., language development, lexical knowledge, general information). However, those most frequently used rely highly on verbal surface knowledge, rather than reflecting broader knowledge.

URLhttp://www.oxfordbibliographies.com/view/document/obo-9780199828340/obo-9780199828340-0207.xml

Presentation of the Study LIVES_SHPHealth on Experiences after Psychological and Physical Health Problems. A Cross-sectional Study within a Longitudinal Panel-survey

TitrePresentation of the Study LIVES_SHPHealth on Experiences after Psychological and Physical Health Problems. A Cross-sectional Study within a Longitudinal Panel-survey
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursKlaas, HS, Morselli, D, Tillmann, R, Pin, S, Spini, D
JournalLIVES Working paper
Volume78
Pagination1-66
Date Published06/2019
ISSN2296-1658
Mots-cléshealth, health survey, mental health, survey design, Swiss Household Panel
Résumé

Background. In Switzerland, recovery-oriented mental health research collecting nonclinical population data remains scarce. People experiencing psychological health problems (HPs) are more likely to be stigmatised than people experiencing physical HPs. Here, we present a study in which participants of the Swiss Household Panel (SHP) were contacted for an auto-administered questionnaire survey in order to report on the impact that psychological or physical HPs had on their identity, experiences of stigmatisation, subjective state of recovery as well as positive and negative consequences for various aspects of their lives. This report describes the study aims, procedure, measures, sample selection and response analyses, sample composition and health characteristics.

Methods. 1426 persons were selected based on their health reports in the SHP, 713 for a psychological and 713 for a physical HP. We analysed the impact of the selection and the response process on sociodemographic characteristics and on psychosocial variables (social integration and mental health indicators). We also investigated mode (online versus paperpencil) effects. Difference between groups were analysed using Chi-Square and t-tests.

Results. The response rate was 60.17%; 47.83% of the data could be used for analyses. There were slight mode effects, especially regarding sociodemographic variables. Respondents, in comparison to non-respondents, showed higher levels of education, social trust, and satisfaction in several domains. Finally, we obtained a heterogeneous convenience sample from the German and French speaking parts of the Swiss population that had experienced past or ongoing health problems. Women, individuals with high educational
levels, Swiss nationals, and individuals living in the French-speaking part were overrepresented. The principal HPs reported were the most frequent and burdensome for the Swiss population, mainly depression, burnout, anxiety, orthopaedic problems, allergies and cardiac problems. Most participants had received treatment for their HP and had experienced it already for some years.

Conclusion. Using these data enables to analyse the impact of frequent and burdensome psychological and physical HPs on people’s lives in a heterogeneous convenience sample that has already had some time to deal with their HPs. Future research should try to reach more socially isolated individuals, stigmatised illness groups and individuals without treatment.

DOI10.12682/lives.2296-1658.2019.78

Cognitive function and its associations in older adults from Amazonas, Brazil

TitreCognitive function and its associations in older adults from Amazonas, Brazil
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuteursTinôco, MAntonieta, Gouveia, ÉRúbio, Ihle, A, Kliegel, M, Jurema, J, Machado, FTeles, Odim, APinto, Muniz, BRégia, Ribeiro, EEsteves, Gouveia, BRaquel, Freitas, DLuís
JournalRevista Brasileira de Atividade Física & Saúde
Volume23
Nombree0013
ISSN1413-3482
Résumé

The objectives of this study were: (1) to investigate the age-related differences in cognitive function (CF), nutritional status (MNA), physical activity (AF), quality of life (QoL), depression, social sat- isfaction (SS) and socioeconomic status (SES), and (2) to explore the relationships between CF and the previous variables. This cross sectional study included 268 men and 433 women (aged 71.4 ± 7.0 years). CF was determined with the Cognitive Telephone Screening Instrument (COGTEL) and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Correlates were as follows: Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), PA (Baecke questionnaire modified for older adults), Quality of life (QoL SF- 12), Geriatrics Depression Scale (GDS), Satisfaction and Social Support Scale, and Socioeconomic status (SES). All instruments were applied in a face to face interview. An independent t-test identi- fied significantly higher scores in young-old adults (≤ 69 years) for CF (p

URLhttps://archive-ouverte.unige.ch/unige:114454
DOI10.12820/rbafs.23e0013

The relationship between episodic future thinking and prospective memory in middle childhood: Mechanisms depend on task type

TitreThe relationship between episodic future thinking and prospective memory in middle childhood: Mechanisms depend on task type
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursTerrett, G, Horner, K, White, R, Henry, JD, Kliegel, M, Labuschagne, I, Rendell, PG
JournalJournal of Experimental Child Psychology
Volume178
Pagination198–213
ISSN0022-0965
Résumé

Episodic future thinking (EFT), the ability to imagine experiencing a future event, and prospective memory (PM), the ability to remember and carry out a planned action, are core aspects of future-oriented cognition that have individually been the focus of research attention in the developmental literature. However, the relationship between EFT and PM, including the extent to which it varies with PM task type, remains poorly delineated, particularly in middle childhood. The current study tested this relationship in 62 typically developing children aged 8–12 years. Results indicated that EFT ability was significantly related to performance on three types of PM tasks (regular and irregular event based and regular time based). Age was not found to moderate the relationship. Children’s performance on the retrospective memory component of the PM tasks mediated the relationship between EFT ability and their performance on three types of PM tasks. For irregular event-based tasks, however, EFT made an additional significant contribution. This study adds to the limited empirical literature supporting a relationship between EFT and PM in this age band and supports theoretical models arguing that EFT ability may support PM performance by strengthening the encoding of PM task details in retrospective memory. However, additional mechanisms were also indicated for irregular event-based PM tasks, possibly involving strengthening of cue–context associations. These data show for the first time that the contribution of EFT to children’s PM performance varies across task types. This study provides an important and novel contribution to current understanding of the processes that underlie PM development.

URLhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022096518305046
DOI10.1016/j.jecp.2018.10.003

Young adult excess mortality in Switzerland: The role of socioeconomic vulnerability

TitreYoung adult excess mortality in Switzerland: The role of socioeconomic vulnerability
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuteursRemund, A
JournalPopulation
Volume73
Nombre3
Pagination445–480
ISSN0032-4663
Résumé

Beyond the first years of life, the risk of dying increases with age, but more or less quickly. Early adulthood is marked by a temporary increase of this risk, in particular for young males. The origins of this excess mortality remain poorly understood and are hotly debated. Does it concern all young people? Is it attributable to biological or to social factors? Adrien Remund describes the excess mortality of a cohort of young adults living in Switzerland and focuses on the moderating or amplifying role of socioeconomic factors.

URLhttps://www.cairn-int.info/article-E_POPU_1803_0467–young-adult-excess-mortality-in.htm
DOI10.3917/popu.1803.0445

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