Trajectories of resilience among widows: A latent transition model

TitreTrajectories of resilience among widows: A latent transition model
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursBennett, KMary, Morselli, D, Spahni, S, Perrig-Chiello, P
JournalAging & Mental Health
Pagination1–8
ISSN1360-7863
Mots-cléslatent transition analysis, later life, resilience, widowhood, www2
Résumé

Objectives: In 2015 we identified three profiles of adaptation following spousal bereavement: Vulnerables; Copers and Resilients (Spahni, Morselli, Perrig-Chiello, & Bennett, 2015). However, adaptation to spousal bereavement is a dynamic process. Thus, we examine the trajectories of the same participants longitudinally over two years. We identify the stability and change in profiles of adaptation to widowhood; probability of stability and change; factors that influence trajectories in profile membership.Methods: Data stem from a longitudinal questionnaire study of 309 older widowed people. The questionnaire included five measures of well-being, serving as the dependent variables of this analysis, and measures of personal resources and contextual factors, including social support, marital happiness, psychological resilience, and demography. Data was analysed using latent transition analysis of the variables loneliness, hopelessness, depressive symptoms, life satisfaction, and subjective health.Results: The analysis replicated the three Wave 1 profiles as the best theoretical fit: Vulnerables; Copers; and Resilients. Stability was most common, but some participants moved to more or less adaptive profiles, the former being more frequent. Younger age, longer time since widowhood, new life perspectives facilitated adaptation. Those transitioning to less adaptive profiles were more likely to be women and older.Discussion: The path to adaptation was not linear. Many of the explanatory variables contributed both to positive and negative adaptation. These include previous caring experience, education, psychological resilience and personal strength. This suggests these explanatory variables do not act in isolation but are likely to interact with each other, and with other, yet not measured, factors.

URLhttps://doi.org/10.1080/13607863.2019.1647129
DOI10.1080/13607863.2019.1647129

Distraction and reappraisal efficiency on immediate negative emotional responses: Role of trait anxiety

TitreDistraction and reappraisal efficiency on immediate negative emotional responses: Role of trait anxiety
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursEfinger, L, Thuillard, S, Dan-Glauser, ES
JournalAnxiety, Stress, & Coping
Volume32
Nombre4
Pagination412–427
ISSN1061-5806
Mots-clésautonomic nervous system recordings, distraction, emotion regulation efficiency, Emotional reactivity, reappraisal, trait anxiety, www2
Résumé

Background and Objectives: Emotion regulation involves attempts to influence emotion unfolding and may target experiential, expressive and physiological responses. Several strategies can be used, such as reappraisal (re-evaluating the emotional situation to reduce its emotional meaning) or distraction (turning the attention toward non-emotional aspects of the situation). Previous research on these regulation strategies produced contrasting results regarding their efficiency and we hypothesize that this could be due to individual differences such as trait anxiety.Design and Methods: Participants (N = 77) were confronted with negative pictures and we examined the differential emotional reactivity according to trait anxiety, followed by a comparison of the efficiency of reappraisal and distraction in reducing emotional responses.Results: Results show that trait anxiety has no impact on reactivity at the experiential and expressive levels, but has an impact at the physiological level, where high anxiety individuals show increased cardiac orienting effect, as well as higher skin conductance and respiratory rate. Regarding regulation, reappraisal and distraction successfully reduce emotional experience and expressivity, but not physiological arousal.Conclusions: Such contrasting results involve that high trait anxiety individuals might benefit from the use of other kinds of strategies than reappraisal and distraction, some that may successfully target physiological responses.

URLhttps://doi.org/10.1080/10615806.2019.1597859
DOI10.1080/10615806.2019.1597859

Social capital and health: A systematic review of systematic reviews

TitreSocial capital and health: A systematic review of systematic reviews
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursEhsan, A, Klaas, HSophie, Bastianen, A, Spini, D
JournalSSM - Population Health
Volume8
ISSN2352-8273
Mots-cléshealth, Lifecourse, social capital, Social cohesion, social identity, social networks, systematic review, www2
Résumé

There are many systematic reviews on social capital (SC) and various health outcomes, but each of these reviews shows one piece of the larger SC and health puzzle. The aim of this research was to systematically review systematic reviews on SC and health, in order to provide an overview of existing evidence and to identify strategies for future research. Nine databases were searched for key words that could fall under the broad umbrella of SC and health outcomes. We screened 4941 titles and abstracts and read 187 reviews before retaining 20 of them. A critical appraisal of each review was conducted. The reviews show there is good evidence to suggest that SC predicts better mental and physical health, and indicators of SC are protective against mortality. At the same time, many reviews also found numerous non-significant and negative relationships that are important to consider. It was unclear whether SC interventions for health were really improving SC, or other aspects of the social environment. Overall, this research shows that evidence on how various aspects of SC affect different health outcomes for different actors remains unclear. Intergroup and lifecourse perspectives could help clarify this link. Future research could benefit from conceptualizing the link between SC and health in a what, who, where, when, why and how framework.

URLhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352827319301144
DOI10.1016/j.ssmph.2019.100425

Progress and gaps in Quebec’s autism policy: A comprehensive review and thematic analysis

TitreProgress and gaps in Quebec’s autism policy: A comprehensive review and thematic analysis
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursZeidan, J, Shikako-Thomas, K, Ehsan, A, Maioni, A, Elsabbagh, M
JournalCanadian Journal of Public Health
ISSN1920-7476
Mots-clésAutism, Autisme, Policy, Politiques, Québec, Services, www2
Résumé

ObjectiveConsistent with a national and global trend, prevalence estimates of autism have risen steadily in Quebec, causing concerns regarding quality and availability of diagnostic and intervention services as well as policies guiding service delivery and their efficacy. We conducted an analysis of Quebec’s autism policies to determine recent advances, challenges and gaps in the planning and delivery of provincial autism services.MethodsWe identify autism policy priorities in Quebec through a comprehensive review and a thematic analysis of past and present policies, consider their compliance with national and international human rights and health frameworks and identify policy gaps.ResultsAutism policies articulated at a provincial level in Quebec are comprehensive, well grounded in international and national frameworks and considerate of existing barriers in the systems. Quebec policies reflect long-standing recognition of many barriers affecting service utilization and quality. Root cause of challenges currently confronting the policy environment in Quebec includes limitations in: specific measures to enhance a person-centred approach across the lifespan, evaluation of economic costs associated with autism, utilization of research evidence, and enactment of policies.ConclusionEarly intervention services, building capacity in existing resources through training programs, and integrating research through research translation initiatives can help the Québec government improve the quality and efficacy of services while reducing long-term costs to the systems and promoting quality of life for individuals with autism and their families.

URLhttps://doi.org/10.17269/s41997-019-00202-7
DOI10.17269/s41997-019-00202-7

Social loneliness after divorce: time-dependent differential benefits of personality, multiple important group memberships, and self-continuity

TitreSocial loneliness after divorce: time-dependent differential benefits of personality, multiple important group memberships, and self-continuity
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursLampraki, C, Jopp, DS, Spini, D, Morselli, D
JournalGerontology
Volume65
Nombre3
Pagination275–287
ISSN0304-324X, 1423-0003
Mots-cléswww2
Résumé

\textbf\textitBackground: Critical events in the second half of life, such as divorce, pose a significant threat to well-being. Individuals undergoing divorce often experience feelings of social loneliness and may benefit differently from available resources depending on how much time has passed since the event. Personality traits have been found to be related to adaptation, with particularly strong effects immediately after the critical event. Other resources, such as identity-stabilizing mechanisms (i.e., valued social groups and self-continuity), may play a role only later in adaptation. However, little is known about the benefits of these resources and their potentially time-dependent effects on social loneliness when one is overcoming later-life divorce. \textbf\textitObjectives: This study investigates the role of psychological (e.g., personality, self-continuity, multiple important group memberships) and social resources (e.g., new partner, having someone to help deal with divorce) for social loneliness in two post-divorce phases, using a married group as the reference, controlling for sociodemographic aspects and health. \textbf\textitMethods: A representative sample of 850 divorced (aged 40–79 years) and 869 married individuals (aged 40–78 years) living in Switzerland were compared, using multiple regression analyses. \textbf\textitResults: Differential predictive patterns for social loneliness between the two divorced groups and the married group were observed. For the short-term divorced (up to 2 years after divorce), higher extroversion and agreeableness and lower neuroticism were associated with lower levels of loneliness. For the long-term divorced (2–5 years after divorce) and for those who remained married, extroversion was similarly important for loneliness. Additionally, higher levels of self-continuity and multiple group memberships predicted lower loneliness, but the short-term divorced did not benefit from them. Having someone to help overcome the divorce benefited members of both divorced groups. A new partner was related to less loneliness, but only in the long-term divorced group. \textbf\textitConclusions: Our findings demonstrate that the effects of psychological and social resources on social loneliness vary by adaptation phase. Although extroversion is beneficial for all divorced and married individuals, other personality traits play a more decisive role in the initial adaptation phase. Identity-promoting resources (i.e., multiple group memberships, perceived self-continuity) are beneficial only later in the adaptation process. To be successful, professional interventions must be tailored as needed.

URLhttps://www.karger.com/Article/FullText/494112
DOI10.1159/000494112
Identifiant (ID) PubMed30605909

The role of adult socioeconomic and relational reserves regarding the effect of childhood misfortune on late-life depressive symptoms

TitreThe role of adult socioeconomic and relational reserves regarding the effect of childhood misfortune on late-life depressive symptoms
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
Auteursvon Arx, M, Cheval, B, Sieber, S, Orsholits, D, Widmer, E, Kliegel, M, Guessous, I, Kelly-Irving, M, Courvoisier, DS, Boisgontier, MP, Cullati, S
JournalSSM - Population Health
Volume8
Pagination100434
ISSN2352-8273
Mots-clésChildhood misfortune, Europe, Late-life depression, life course, Reserves, www2
Résumé

Background Childhood misfortune is associated with late-life depressive symptoms, but it remains an open question whether adult socioeconomic and relational reserves could reduce the association between childhood misfortune and late-life depressive symptoms. Methods Using the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE), data from 8'357 individuals (35'260 observations) aged 50–96 years and living in 11 European countries were used to examine associations between three indicators of childhood misfortune (adverse childhood events, poor childhood health, and childhood socioeconomic circumstances) and late-life depressive symptoms. Subsequently, we tested whether these associations were mediated by education, occupational position, the ability to make ends meet, and potential or perceived relational reserves; that is family members or significant others who can provide help in case of need, respectively. Analyses were stratified by gender and adjusted for confounding and control variables. Results Adult socioeconomic reserves partly mediated the associations between adverse childhood events, poor childhood health and late-life depressive symptoms. The associations with the third indicator of childhood misfortune (childhood socioeconomic circumstances) were fully mediated by adult socioeconomic reserves in men, and partly mediated in women. None of the associations were mediated by relational reserves. However, perceived relational reserves were associated with fewer late-life depressive symptoms. Conclusion Childhood socioeconomic disadvantage can be mitigated more easily over the life course than adverse childhood events and poor childhood health, especially in men. Perceived relational reserves work primarily as a protective force against late-life depressive symptoms and may be particularly important in the context of the cumulative effect of childhood adversities.

DOI10.1016/j.ssmph.2019.100434

Early-life socioeconomic circumstances explain health differences in old age, but not their evolution over time

TitreEarly-life socioeconomic circumstances explain health differences in old age, but not their evolution over time
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursCheval, B, Orsholits, D, Sieber, S, Stringhini, S, Courvoisier, D, Kliegel, M, Boisgontier, MP, Cullati, S
JournalJ Epidemiol Community Health
ISSN0143-005X, 1470-2738
Mots-clésageing trajectories, early life, health status, Healthy ageing, Socioeconomic factors, www2
Résumé

Background Early-life socioeconomic circumstances (SEC) are associated with health in old age. However, epidemiological evidences on the influence of these early-life risk factors on trajectories of healthy ageing are inconsistent, preventing drawing solid conclusion about their potential influence. Here, to fill this knowledge gap, we used a statistical approach adapted to estimating change over time and an outcome-wide epidemiology approach to investigate whether early-life SEC were associated with the level of and rate of decline of physical, cognitive and emotional functioning over time. Methods We used data on more than 23 000 adults in older age from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe, a 12-year large-scale longitudinal study with repeated measurements of multiple health indicators of the same participants over time (2004 –2015, assessments every 2 years). Confounder-adjusted linear growth curve models were used to examine the associations of early-life SEC with the evolution of muscle strength, lung function, cognitive function, depressive symptoms and well-being over time. Results We consistently found an association between early-life SEC and the mean levels of all health indicators at age 63.5, with a critical role played by the cultural aspect of disadvantage. These associations were only partly explained by adult-life SEC factors. By contrast, evidences supporting an association between early-life SEC and the rate of change in health indicators were weak and inconsistent. Conclusions Early-life SEC are associated with health in old age, but not with trajectories of healthy ageing. Conceptual models in life course research should consider the possibility of a limited influence of early-life SEC on healthy ageing trajectories.

URLhttps://jech.bmj.com/content/early/2019/04/10/jech-2019-212110
DOI10.1136/jech-2019-212110

Cognitive resources moderate the adverse impact of poor perceived neighborhood conditions on self-reported physical activity of older adults

TitreCognitive resources moderate the adverse impact of poor perceived neighborhood conditions on self-reported physical activity of older adults
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursCheval, B, Rebar, AL, Miller, MW, Sieber, S, Orsholits, D, Baranyi, G, Courvoisier, D, Cullati, S, Sander, D, Chalabaev, A, Boisgontier, MP
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume126
Pagination105741
ISSN0091-7435
Mots-clésaging, Cognitive resources, Neighborhood, physical activity, www2
Résumé

Poor neighborhood conditions are associated with lower levels of physical activity for older adults but socio-ecological models posit that physical activity depends on both environmental and individual factors. Older adults' ability to overcome environmental barriers to physical activity may partially rely on cognitive resources. However, evidence on the moderating role of these cognitive resources in the associations between environmental barriers and physical activity is still lacking. We analyzed cross-national and longitudinal data on 28,393 adults aged 50 to 96 years as part of the SHARE. Lack of access to services and neighborhood nuisances were used as indicators of poor neighborhood conditions. Delayed recall and verbal fluency were used as indicators of cognitive resources. Confounder-adjusted generalized estimation equations were conducted to test associations between neighborhood conditions and self-reported moderate physical activity, as well as the moderating role of cognitive resources. Results showed that poor neighborhood conditions reduced the odds of engagement in physical activity. Cognitive resources robustly reduced the adverse influence of poor neighborhood conditions on physical activity. Participants with lower cognitive resource scores showed lower odds of engaging in physical activity when neighborhood conditions were poorer, whereas these conditions were not related to this engagement for participants with higher cognitive resource scores. These findings suggest that cognitive resources can temper the detrimental effect of poor neighborhood conditions on physical activity. Public policies should target both individual and environmental factors to tackle the current pandemic of physical inactivity more comprehensively.

URLhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0091743519302038
DOI10.1016/j.ypmed.2019.05.029

Association between adverse childhood experiences and muscle strength in older age

TitreAssociation between adverse childhood experiences and muscle strength in older age
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursCheval, B, Chabert, C, Sieber, S, Orsholits, D, Cooper, R, Guessous, I, Blane, D, Kliegel, M, Courvoisier, DS, Kelly-Irving, M, Boisgontier, MP, Cullati, S
JournalGerontology
Pagination1–11
ISSN0304-324X, 1423-0003
Mots-cléswww2
Résumé

\textbf\textitBackground: Muscle weakness – a biomarker of health – may have its origins in early life and be related to factors such as adverse childhood experiences (ACE), which refer to a set of early-life traumatic and stressful psychosocial events out of the child’s control. To date, evidence of an association between ACE and muscle strength in older age is lacking. ­\textbf\textitObjective: Here, we assessed the associations between ACE during the first 15 years of life and the risk of low muscle strength (LMS) later in life. We also examined whether adult-life socioeconomic circumstances (i.e., educational attainment, main occupational position, and satisfaction with household financial situation) and unhealthy behaviors (i.e., physical inactivity, unhealthy eating, smoking, and high level of alcohol consumption) explained this association. \textbf\textitMethods: We used data from the Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe, a 12-year cohort study with 6 ­repeated measurements between 2004 and 2015. Muscle strength was measured using a handheld dynamometer. Confounder-adjusted logistic mixed-effect models were used to examine the associations between ACE (child in care, parental death, parental mental illness, parental drinking, period of hunger, or property taken away) and the risk of LMS in older age. ­\textbf\textitResults: 24,179 participants (96,372 observations; 13,477 women; aged 50–96 years) living in 14 countries were included. LMS increased with age for both genders. For women, there was a gradual increase in the risk of LMS with the number of experienced ACE (ORs = 1.22 for 1 ACE, 1.74 for ≥2 ACE compared to no ACE). However, there was no significant association among men. This association was only slightly attenuated when adjusting for socioeconomic circumstances and unhealthy behaviors in adulthood. \textbf\textitConclusions: ACE are associated with later-life muscle weakness among women. These associations were not compensated by the adoption of healthy behaviors or an improvement in socioeconomic circumstances in adulthood. These results suggest that tackling these early-life risk factors in women could promote long-term grip strength, a biomarker of aging.

DOI10.1159/000494972

A longitudinal study of neighbourhood conditions and depression in ageing European adults: Do the associations vary by exposure to childhood stressors?

TitreA longitudinal study of neighbourhood conditions and depression in ageing European adults: Do the associations vary by exposure to childhood stressors?
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursBaranyi, G, Sieber, S, Pearce, J, Cheval, B, Dibben, C, Kliegel, M, Cullati, S
JournalPreventive Medicine
Pagination105764
ISSN0091-7435
Mots-clésAdverse childhood experiences, depression, Healthy ageing, Psychological, Residence characteristics, resilience, www2
Résumé

Emerging literature emphasises the association between neighbourhood conditions and late life depression. Childhood experiences, crucial for life course development of mental health, may modify how neighbourhood affects subsequent depression. This study assessed the longitudinal associations of access to services and neighbourhood nuisance with depression among older adults, and tested whether these associations varied by exposure to childhood stressors. Data were drawn from the cross-national Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe, a prospective cohort study between 2004/2005 and 2015, representative for European adults over the age of 50. Individual perceptions of neighbourhood were measured at baseline; childhood stressors, defined as socioeconomic conditions, adverse experiences and health problems, were collected retrospectively. Multilevel logistic regression estimated the risk of depression (n = 10,328). Access to services were negatively (OR = 0.78, 95% CI 0.68–0.90) and neighbourhood nuisance positively (OR = 1.36, 95% CI 1.18–1.56) associated with the probability of depression during follow-up. We found interactions between neighbourhood and childhood socioeconomic conditions, but not with adverse experiences and health problems. While older adults who grew up in better childhood socioeconomic conditions benefited more from living in a residential area with good access to services, they were at higher risk of developing depression when residing in areas with more neighbourhood nuisances. Older adults' mental health can benefit from better access to public transportation and neighbourhood amenities, while physical and social problems in the local area increase the risk of depression. Importantly, socioeconomic circumstances in early life may influence vulnerability to neighbourhood effects in older age.

DOI10.1016/j.ypmed.2019.105764

Impact of legal status change on undocumented migrants’ health and well-being (Parchemins): Protocol of a 4-year, prospective, mixed-methods study

TitreImpact of legal status change on undocumented migrants’ health and well-being (Parchemins): Protocol of a 4-year, prospective, mixed-methods study
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursJackson, Y, Courvoisier, DS, Duvoisin, A, Ferro-Luzzi, G, Bodenmann, P, Chauvin, P, Guessous, I, Wolff, H, Cullati, S, Burton-Jeangros, C
JournalBMJ Open
Volume9
Nombre5
Mots-cléswww2
Résumé

Introduction Migrants without residency permit, known as undocumented, tend to live in precarious conditions and be exposed to an accumulation of adverse determinants of health. Only scarce evidence exists on the social, economic and living conditions-related factors influencing their health status and well-being. No study has assessed the impact of legal status regularisation. The Parchemins study is the first prospective, mixed-methods study aiming at measuring the impact on health and well-being of a regularisation policy on undocumented migrants in Europe.Methods and analysis The Parchemins study will compare self-rated health and satisfaction with life in a group of adult undocumented migrants who qualify for applying for a residency permit (intervention group) with a group of undocumented migrants who lack one or more eligibility criteria for regularisation (control group) in Geneva Canton, Switzerland. Asylum seekers are not included in this study. The total sample will include 400 participants. Data collection will consist of standardised questionnaires complemented by semidirected interviews in a subsample (n=38) of migrants qualifying for regularisation. The baseline data will be collected just before or during the regularisation, and participants will subsequently be followed up yearly for 3 years. The quantitative part will explore variables about health (ie, health status, occupational health, health-seeking behaviours, access to care, healthcare utilisation), well-being (measured by satisfaction with different dimensions of life), living conditions (ie, employment, accommodation, social support) and economic situation (income, expenditures). Several confounders including sociodemographic characteristics and migration history will be collected. The qualitative part will explore longitudinally the experience of change in legal status at individual and family levels.Ethics and dissemination This study was approved by the Ethics Committee of Geneva, Switzerland. All participants provided informed consent. Results will be shared with undocumented migrants and disseminated in scientific journals and conferences. Fully anonymised data will be available to researchers.

URLhttp://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/9/5/e028336.abstract
DOI10.1136/bmjopen-2018-028336

Does the primary resource of sex education matter? A Swiss national study

TitreDoes the primary resource of sex education matter? A Swiss national study
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursBarrense-Dias, Y, Akre, C, Suris, J-C, Berchtold, A, Morselli, D, Jacot-Descombes, C, Leeners, B
JournalThe Journal of Sex Research
Pagination1–11
Date Publishedjun
ISSN0022-4499, 1559-8519
Mots-cléswww2
URLhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00224499.2019.1626331
DOI10.1080/00224499.2019.1626331

Which people are willing to maintain their subordinated position? Social dominance orientation as antecedent to compliance to harsh power tactics in a higher education setting

TitreWhich people are willing to maintain their subordinated position? Social dominance orientation as antecedent to compliance to harsh power tactics in a higher education setting
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursTesi, A, Aiello, A, Morselli, D, Giannetti, E, Pierro, A, Pratto, F
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Date Publishedmay
ISSN01918869
Mots-cléswww2
URLhttps://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0191886919302752
DOI10.1016/j.paid.2019.04.045

Racial income inequality, perceptions of competition, and negative interracial outcomes

TitreRacial income inequality, perceptions of competition, and negative interracial outcomes
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursGordils, J, Sommet, N, Elliot, AJ, Jamieson, JP
JournalSocial Psychological and Personality Science
Pagination194855061983700
Date Publishedapr
ISSN1948-5506, 1948-5514
Mots-cléswww2
URLhttp://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1948550619837003
DOI10.1177/1948550619837003

Sociocognitive conflict regulation: How to make sense of diverging ideas

TitreSociocognitive conflict regulation: How to make sense of diverging ideas
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursButera, F, Sommet, N, Darnon, C
JournalCurrent Directions in Psychological Science
Volume28
Nombre2
Pagination145–151
Date Publishedapr
ISSN0963-7214, 1467-8721
Mots-cléswww2
URLhttp://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0963721418813986
DOI10.1177/0963721418813986

When and why performance goals predict exploitation behaviors: An achievement goal complex analysis of the selection function of assessment

TitreWhen and why performance goals predict exploitation behaviors: An achievement goal complex analysis of the selection function of assessment
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursSommet, N, Nguyen, D, Fahrni, K, Jobin, M, Nguyen, H-P, Sehaqui, H, Butera, F
JournalMotivation and Emotion
Volume43
Nombre2
Pagination266–284
Date Publishedapr
ISSN0146-7239, 1573-6644
Mots-cléswww2
URLhttp://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11031-018-9742-y
DOI10.1007/s11031-018-9742-y

(Mis‐)Coordinating identities in the transition to parenthood: Investigating the co‐development of partners’ parenting, domestic and provider identities before and after the birth of the first child

Titre(Mis‐)Coordinating identities in the transition to parenthood: Investigating the co‐development of partners’ parenting, domestic and provider identities before and after the birth of the first child
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursTurner‐Zwinkels, FM, Spini, D
JournalEuropean Journal of Social Psychology
Date Publishedjun
ISSN0046-2772, 1099-0992
Mots-cléswww2
URLhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/ejsp.2591
DOI10.1002/ejsp.2591

La critique portée par le non-recours aux droits sociaux : Propositions pour développer une approche subalterne

TitreLa critique portée par le non-recours aux droits sociaux : Propositions pour développer une approche subalterne
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursLeresche, F
JournalSociologieS [En ligne]
Mots-cléswww2
URLhttp://journals.openedition.org/sociologies/11438

Inequality beyond networking: personal networks and mobilization of contacts by young job seekers in Barcelona

TitreInequality beyond networking: personal networks and mobilization of contacts by young job seekers in Barcelona
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursSaura, DMuntanyola, Barranco, O, Vacchiano, M
JournalRevista Española de Sociología
Volume28
Nombre2
Pagination207–226
ISSN2445-0367
Mots-clésinequality, labour market, Networking, social capital, social network analysis
Résumé

How young job seekers mobilize their contacts in the labour market? We look at mobilization of personal networks of young adults in Barcelona. We consider the strength of ties and status homophily as mecha- nisms of personal networks as for the consolidation of social capital. Our qualitative analysis of 18 in- terviews with job seekers explores their personal networks and labour market trajectories. We applied Social Network Analysis (SNA). Our analysis of social capital indicates the existence of a relation between the cultural and economic capitals of job seekers and the compositional features of their networks. Re- sults show how networks are similarly heterogeneous in terms of strength of ties, and mostly homophilous in educational levels. But these similarities in terms of social capital come with sharp inequalities in the patterns of mobilized contacts and their success in finding a job. These differences can be explained by the type and volume of capitals of job seekers. Those with better positions in the social structure and sta- ble trajectories seem to mobilize fewer contacts more efficiently, getting better outcomes.

URLhttps://recyt.fecyt.es/index.php/res/article/view/66536
DOI10.22325/fes/res.2019.01

Human beings as receivers, doers and judges. The anthropological foundations of sustainable public action in the capability approach

TitreHuman beings as receivers, doers and judges. The anthropological foundations of sustainable public action in the capability approach
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuteursBonvin, J-M, Laruffa, F
JournalCommunity, Work & Family
Volume21
Nombre5
Pagination502–518
ISSN1366-8803, 1469-3615
Mots-cléswww2
URLhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13668803.2018.1526777
DOI10.1080/13668803.2018.1526777

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