Distinct effects of cognitive versus somatic anxiety on cognitive performance in old age: the role of working memory capacity

TitreDistinct effects of cognitive versus somatic anxiety on cognitive performance in old age: the role of working memory capacity
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuteursMella, N, Vallet, F, Beaudoin, M, Fagot, D, Baeriswyl, M, Ballhausen, N, Métral, G, Sauter, J, Ihle, A, Gabriel, R, Oris, M, Kliegel, M, Desrichard, O
JournalAging & Mental Health
ISSN1360-7863
Mots-clésaging, cognitive anxiety, somatic anxiety, working memory
Résumé

Objective: The adverse effects of anxiety on cognition are widely recognized. According to Attentional Control Theory, worry (i.e. facet of cognitive anxiety) is the component that is responsible for these effects, and working memory capacity (WMC) plays an important role in regulating them. Despite the increasing importance of this problem with aging, little is known about how these mechanisms interact in old age. In this study, we explored the distinct contributions of the somatic and cognitive components of anxiety to neuropsychological performance, and the potential moderating role of WMC.Method: We administered cognitive tasks testing processing speed, cognitive flexibility and working memory to 605 older adults, who also underwent depression and test anxiety assessments (data from VLV study).Results: Multiple regression analyses showed that cognitive (but not somatic) aspects of anxiety affected cognitive flexibility. The effect of cognitive anxiety on processing speed was moderated by WMC: the anxiety-performance association was lower for participants with greater WMC.Conclusion: Results confirmed the specific role of worry in the anxiety–performance relationship in old age and supported the hypothesis that working memory resources regulates its deleterious effect on cognition. The absence of a moderation effect in the more costly switching task may reflect a limitation of resources with aging.

URLhttps://doi.org/10.1080/13607863.2018.1548566
DOI10.1080/13607863.2018.1548566

Motivation as a mediator of the relation between cognitive reserve and cognitive Performance

TitreMotivation as a mediator of the relation between cognitive reserve and cognitive Performance
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuteursVallet, F, Mella, N, Ihle, A, Beaudoin, M, Fagot, D, Ballhausen, N, Baeriswyl, M, Schlemmer, M, Oris, M, Kliegel, M, Desrichard, O
JournalThe Journals of Gerontology: Series B
Résumé

AbstractObjectives. Interindividual differences in cognitive aging may be explained by differences in cognitive reserve (CR) that are built up across the life

URLhttps://academic.oup.com/psychsocgerontology/advance-article/doi/10.1093/geronb/gby144/5232647
DOI10.1093/geronb/gby144

Improving methodological standards in behavioral interventions for cognitive enhancement

TitreImproving methodological standards in behavioral interventions for cognitive enhancement
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursC. Green, S, Bavelier, D, Kramer, AF, Vinogradov, S, Ansorge, U, Ball, KK, Bingel, U, Chein, JM, Colzato, LS, Edwards, JD, Facoetti, A, Gazzaley, A, Gathercole, SE, Ghisletta, P, Gori, S, Granic, I, Hillman, CH, Hommel, B, Jaeggi, SM, Kanske, P, Karbach, J, Kingstone, A, Kliegel, M, Klingberg, T, Kühn, S, Levi, DM, Mayer, RE, McLaughlin, ACollins, McNamara, DS, Morris, MClare, Nahum, M, Newcombe, NS, Panizzutti, R, Prakash, RShaurya, Rizzo, A, Schubert, T, Seitz, AR, Short, SJ, Singh, I, Slotta, JD, Strobach, T, Thomas, MSC, Tipton, E, Tong, X, Vlach, HA, Wetherell, JLoebach, Wexler, A, Witt, CM
JournalJournal of Cognitive Enhancement
ISSN2509-3304
Mots-clésBehavioral intervention methodology, Cognitive enhancement
Résumé

There is substantial interest in the possibility that cognitive skills can be improved by dedicated behavioral training. Yet despite the large amount of work being conducted in this domain, there is not an explicit and widely agreed upon consensus around the best methodological practices. This document seeks to fill this gap. We start from the perspective that there are many types of studies that are important in this domain—e.g., feasibility, mechanistic, efficacy, and effectiveness. These studies have fundamentally different goals, and, as such, the best-practice methods to meet those goals will also differ. We thus make suggestions in topics ranging from the design and implementation of control groups, to reporting of results, to dissemination and communication, taking the perspective that the best practices are not necessarily uniform across all study types. We also explicitly recognize and discuss the fact that there are methodological issues around which we currently lack the theoretical and/or empirical foundation to determine best practices (e.g., as pertains to assessing participant expectations). For these, we suggest important routes forward, including greater interdisciplinary collaboration with individuals from domains that face related concerns. Our hope is that these recommendations will greatly increase the rate at which science in this domain advances.

URLhttps://doi.org/10.1007/s41465-018-0115-y
DOI10.1007/s41465-018-0115-y

Explaining age-differences in working memory: the role of updating, inhibition, and shifting

TitreExplaining age-differences in working memory: the role of updating, inhibition, and shifting
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuteursZuber, S, Ihle, A, Loaiza, VM, Schnitzspahn, K, Stahl, C, Phillips, LH, Kaller, CP, Kliegel, M
JournalPsychology & Neuroscience
ISSN1983-3288
URLhttps://abdn.pure.elsevier.com/en/publications/explaining-age-differences-in-working-memory-the-role-of-updating
DOI10.1037/pne0000151

Laboratory vs. naturalistic prospective memory task predictions: young adults are overconfident outside of the laboratory

TitreLaboratory vs. naturalistic prospective memory task predictions: young adults are overconfident outside of the laboratory
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursCauvin, S, Moulin, C, Souchay, C, Schnitzspahn, K, Kliegel, M
JournalMemory
Volume27
Nombre5
Pagination592–602
ISSN0965-8211
Mots-clésjudgment-of-learning, metacognition, prospective memory
Résumé

This study investigated whether individuals can predict their future prospective memory (PM) performance in a lab-based task and in a naturalistic task. Metacognitive awareness was assessed by asking participants to give judgments-of-learning (JOLs) on an item-level for the prospective (that something has to be done) and retrospective (what to do) PM component. In addition, to explore whether giving predictions influences PM performance, we compared a control group (without predictions) to a prediction group. Results revealed that giving predictions did not change PM performance. Moreover, participants were underconfident in their PM performance in the lab-based task, while they were overconfident in the naturalistic task. In addition, item-level JOLs indicated that they were inaccurate in predicting what items they will recall or not, but only for the prospective component of the PM task. As for the retrospective component, they were equally accurate in both task settings. This study suggests a dissociation of metacognitive awareness for PM according to both task setting and processing component.

URLhttps://doi.org/10.1080/09658211.2018.1540703
DOI10.1080/09658211.2018.1540703

The age-prospective memory paradox: Is it about motivation?

TitreThe age-prospective memory paradox: Is it about motivation?
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuteursPeter, J, Kliegel, M
JournalClinical and Translational Neuroscience
ISSN2514-183X
Résumé

Prospective memory (PM) is the ability to remember to carry out intentions within a certain delay. PM tasks require a large degree of self-initiated retrieval, and in the absence of a prompt to recall, people must ‘remember to remember’ by their own volition. Thus, PM is a challenge – especially in old age with increasing health-related PM demands. Surprisingly, older adults show less pronounced impairment in naturalistic PM tasks (e.g. call the experimenter twice a day) than in the laboratory (e.g. press button × when a specific word appears). In fact, the age-PM paradox states that older individuals regularly outperform younger participants in naturalistic PM approaches. In these tasks, older individuals might experience better time management, better planning abilities, or a more efficient use of PM cues. Alternatively, elderly people might be more motivated when performing naturalistic tasks rather than abstract tasks. Here, we review the literature on the impact of motivation on the age-PM paradox by highlighting different methods used to manipulate motivation. We applied a systematic literature search on the Medline/PubMed database and reference lists of articles. Main findings suggest that depending on the type of modulation and the task setting, motivation enhances PM performance in older adults: Increasing importance (either by the experimenter or personally) boosted PM performance in older adults both in the laboratory and in naturalistic settings, while offering a monetary reward did not. Conversely, providing a social motive enhanced PM performance in the laboratory but not in naturalistic approaches. Although these results are encouraging, they also highlight the need for additional research on the impact of motivation on PM performance. Future studies should particularly focus on investigating the effect of non-financial reward on PM performance and elucidate the role of personality traits in the relation between motivation and PM.

URLhttps://doi.org/10.1177/2514183X18807103
DOI10.1177/2514183X18807103

Age bias in selection decisions: The role of facial appearance and fitness impressions

TitreAge bias in selection decisions: The role of facial appearance and fitness impressions
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuteursKaufmann, MC, Krings, F, Zebrowitz, LA, Sczesny, S
JournalFrontiers in Psychology
Volume8
Pagination1–14
ISSN1664-1078
Mots-clésage discrimination, Facial Age Appearance, Fitness Impressions, Hireability, Personnel selection procedures
Résumé

This research examined the impact of facial age appearance on hiring and impressions of fitness as the underlying mechanism. In two experimental hiring simulations, one with lay persons and one with Human Resource professionals, participants evaluated a chronologically older or younger candidate (as indicated by date of birth) with either younger or older facial age appearance (as indicated by a photograph). In both studies, older-looking candidates received lower hireability ratings, due to less favorable fitness impressions. In addition, Study 1 showed that the age bias was reduced when the candidates provided counter-stereotypic information about their fitness. Study 2 showed that facial age-based discrimination is less prevelant in jobs with less costumer contact (e.g., back office).

URLhttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2017.02065/full
DOI10.3389/fpsyg.2017.02065

Impression management in the job interview: An effective way of mitigating discrimination against older applicants?

TitreImpression management in the job interview: An effective way of mitigating discrimination against older applicants?
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuteursGioaba, I, Krings, F
JournalFrontiers in Psychology
Volume8
Pagination1–12
ISSN1664-1078
Résumé

The increasingly aging population in most industrialized societies, coupled with the rather age-diverse current workforce makes discrimination against older employees a prevalent issue, especially in employment contexts. This renders research on ways for reducing this type of discrimination a particularly pressing concern. Drawing on theories of social identity and impression management, our research examines the role of impression management, aimed at refuting common older worker stereotypes, in diminishing bias against older job applicants during the job interview. The study consisted in an experimental hiring simulation conducted on a sample of 515 undergraduate students. Results show that older applicants who used impression management to contradict common older worker stereotypes were perceived as more hirable than those who did not. However, despite this positive effect, discrimination persisted: older applicants were consistently rated as less hirable than their younger counterparts when displaying the same IM behavior. Taken together, this research demonstrates that older job seekers can indeed ameliorate biased interview outcomes by engaging in impression management targeting common age stereotypes; however, it also shows that this strategy is insufficient for overcoming age discrimination entirely. The current study has important implications for theory, by expanding research on the use of impression management in mitigating age discrimination, as well as for practice, by offering older employees a hands-on strategy to reduce bias and stereotyping against them.

URLhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5432631/
DOI10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00770
Identifiant (ID) PubMed28559869

Remember the children, honey! Spouses' gender-role attitudes and working mothers' work-to-family conflict

TitreRemember the children, honey! Spouses' gender-role attitudes and working mothers' work-to-family conflict
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursSteiner, RS, Krings, F, Wiese, BS
JournalApplied Psychology
Volume68
Nombre2
Pagination250–275
ISSN1464-0597
Résumé

Work-to-family conflict (WFC) is a pressing issue for many working parents, in particular for working mothers, and hence, understanding the factors that contribute to WFC is important. We examined gender-role attitudes as antecedents of working mothers' WFC, focusing on both working mothers' own and their husbands' gender-role attitudes. Building on cognitive dissonance theory and crossover research, we assumed that working mothers who hold more traditional gender-role attitudes or who live with a husband who holds more traditional gender-role attitudes experience more WFC. Additionally, we assumed that the strength of these effects further depends on mothers' workload and the age of their children. We tested our hypotheses with several waves of recent data of 222 dual-earner couples, drawn from a representative sample of the Swiss Household Panel. Results showed that working mothers experienced more WFC if they held more traditional gender-role attitudes, but only if they had a high workload. Working mothers also experienced more WFC if their husbands held more traditional gender-role attitudes, however, independently of mothers' workload or age of the children. These results suggest that both spouses' gender-role attitudes influence working mothers' WFC, albeit in somewhat different ways.© 2018 International Association of Applied Psychology.

URLhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/apps.12160
DOI10.1111/apps.12160

How was your day, darling?: A literature review of positive and negative crossover at the work-family interface in couples

TitreHow was your day, darling?: A literature review of positive and negative crossover at the work-family interface in couples
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuteursSteiner, RS, Krings, F
JournalEuropean Psychologist
Volume21
Nombre4
Pagination296–315
ISSN1016-9040, 1878-531X
Résumé

The aim of this paper is to review recent research on negative and positive crossover from work to family and from family to work in couples. The results of the 58 included studies mainly highlight indirect crossover based on spillover processes and marital interactions. More specifically, they show that incumbents’ positive and negative experiences at work cross over to their spouses’ well-being or family functioning through experiences of work-family enrichment and work-family conflict, respectively, and, for negative crossover, through negative marital interactions. Theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed and directions for future research are outlined.

URLhttps://econtent.hogrefe.com/doi/10.1027/1016-9040/a000275
DOI10.1027/1016-9040/a000275

Perceived employability and entrepreneurial intentions across university students and job seekers in Togo: The effect of career adaptability and self-efficacy

TitrePerceived employability and entrepreneurial intentions across university students and job seekers in Togo: The effect of career adaptability and self-efficacy
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursAtitsogbe, KA, Mama, NP, Sovet, L, Pari, P, Rossier, J
JournalFrontiers in Psychology
Volume10
Pagination180
ISSN1664-1078
Mots-cléscareer adaptability, Entrepreneurial intentions, General self efficacy, Self-perceived employability, West Africa
Résumé

This study examined the relationship between two personal resources, career adaptability and general self-efficacy, and two career outcomes, self-perceived employability and entrepreneurial intentions in a West African context, characterized by a developing economy. A Togolese sample of 334 university students and 216 job seekers completed French versions of the General Self-Efficacy Scale, the Self-Perceived Employability Scale, the Entrepreneurial Intentions Scale and an adapted form of the Career Adapt-Abilities Scale. A multi-group path analysis showed that the results are similar for both groups. Career adaptability and general self-efficacy were positively related to self-perceived employability. The contribution of career adaptability was especially strong for job seekers. Only general self-efficacy was related to entrepreneurial intentions. Furthermore, perceived employability was positively related in some way to entrepreneurial intentions in both groups. Career adaptability seems to be especially important for employability among job seekers (activation of resources), whereas entrepreneurial intentions may be more context-dependent. Finally, perceived employability failed to mediate the relationship between personal resources and entrepreneurial intentions in both samples.

URLhttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2019.00180/full
DOI10.3389/fpsyg.2019.00180

Career adaptability and employee well-being over a two-year period: Investigating cross-lagged effects and their boundary conditions

TitreCareer adaptability and employee well-being over a two-year period: Investigating cross-lagged effects and their boundary conditions
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursUrbanaviciute, I, Udayar, S, Rossier, J
JournalCareer Construction Theory: Conceptual and Empirical Advancements
Volume111
Pagination74–90
ISSN0001-8791
Mots-clésBoundary conditions, career adaptability, Cross-lagged models, Employee well-being, Personal resources
Résumé

The present study investigates the role of career adaptability in employee well-being within a period of two years. In addition, it aims to shed light on the boundary conditions that potentially determine the use of adaptability resources and thereby may moderate the relationship between career adaptability and work and life outcomes. The study was based on a representative sample of a Swiss working population from the French- and German-speaking parts of Switzerland. A total of 1007 employed adults participated in the survey two years apart. Cross-lagged structural equation modeling analyses demonstrated a positive cross-lagged effect from career adaptability to job and life satisfaction. Conversely, a negative effect was observed with regard to perceived stress in life. In addition, our findings suggest that certain conditions (such as perceived limitation in career prospects and recent experience of significant work-related events) may strengthen some of the cross-lagged relationships between career adaptability and its positive outcomes. The present study contributes to the career construction literature in two ways. First, it tests a comprehensive cross-lagged model to inspect the longer-term effects of career adaptability on work-related and general well-being, thereby suggesting that career adaptability may have a role in longer-term adaptation due to its contribution to the maintenance of well-being levels. Second, we respond to a call for action regarding the boundary conditions under which career adaptability differentially predicts work and life outcomes (Rudolph, Lavigne, & Zacher, 2017). By identifying recent significant events and perceived career prospects as moderators, we begin to expose some of the complexities of career adaptability and career construction.

URLhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0001879118301234
DOI10.1016/j.jvb.2018.10.013

Decent work in Switzerland: Context, conceptualization, and assessment

TitreDecent work in Switzerland: Context, conceptualization, and assessment
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursMasdonati, J, Schreiber, M, Marcionetti, J, Rossier, J
JournalJournal of Vocational Behavior
Volume110
Pagination12–27
ISSN0001-8791
Mots-clésdecent work, job insecurity, job satisfaction, life satisfaction, Switzerland, Work volition
Résumé

The purpose of this study was to adapt the Decent Work Scale (DWS; Duffy et al., 2017) and extend the research on the Psychology of Working Theory (PWT; Duffy, Blustein, Diemer, & Autin, 2016) within the Swiss context. The results indicated that the Swiss French, German, and Italian versions of the DWS are valid measurements. We then tested PWT predictors and outcomes of decent work. Work volition fully mediated the negative link between unemployment, quantitative job insecurity and low education, and decent work. Perceived social class and qualitative job security predicted decent work with partial mediations through work volition. Work volition and decent work predicted job and life satisfaction. With the exception of age and social class, work volition or decent work fully mediated the relation between predictors and outcomes. Qualitative analyses on an open-ended question showed that the perceived components of decent work covered both the PWT dimensions of decent work and the needs that work is expected to satisfy. These findings highlight the pertinence of using the DWS and applying the PWT in Western and prosperous countries, such as Switzerland.

URLhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0001879118301416
DOI10.1016/j.jvb.2018.11.004

Age, loss minimization, and the role of probability for decision-making

TitreAge, loss minimization, and the role of probability for decision-making
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuteursBest, R, Freund, AM
JournalGerontology
Volume64
Pagination475–484
ISSN0304-324X, 1423-0003
Résumé

\textbf\textitBackground: Older adults are stereotypically considered to be risk averse compared to younger age groups, although meta-analyses on age and the influence of gain/loss framing on risky choices have not found empirical evidence for age differences in risk-taking. \textbf\textitObjective: The current study extends the investigation of age differences in risk preference by including analyses on the effect of the probability of a risky option on choices in gain versus loss situations. \textbf\textitMethods: Participants (\textitn = 130 adults aged 19–80 years) chose between a certain option and a risky option of varying probability in gain- and loss-framed gambles with actual monetary outcomes. \textbf\textitResults: Only younger adults displayed an overall framing effect. Younger and older adults responded differently to probability fluctuations depending on the framing condition. Older adults were more likely to choose the risky option as the likelihood of avoiding a larger loss increased and as the likelihood of a larger gain decreased. Younger adults responded with the opposite pattern: they were more likely to choose the risky option as the likelihood of a larger gain increased and as the likelihood of avoiding a (slightly) larger loss decreased. \textbf\textitConclusion: Results suggest that older adults are more willing to select a risky option when it increases the likelihood that larger losses be avoided, whereas younger adults are more willing to select a risky option when it allows for slightly larger gains. This finding supports expectations based on theoretical accounts of goal orientation shifting away from securing gains in younger adulthood towards maintenance and avoiding losses in older adulthood. Findings are also discussed in respect to the affective enhancement perspective and socioemotional selectivity theory.

URLhttps://www.karger.com/Article/FullText/487636
DOI10.1159/000487636
Identifiant (ID) PubMed29621760

A motivational life-span perspective on procrastination: The development of delaying goal pursuit across adulthood

TitreA motivational life-span perspective on procrastination: The development of delaying goal pursuit across adulthood
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuteursKaftan, OJ, Freund, AM
JournalResearch in Human Development
Volume15
Nombre3-4
Pagination252–264
Date Publishedoct
ISSN1542-7609
Résumé

Procrastination is a common self-regulation failure that has been studied mainly in the educational context, but has been largely neglected in life-span psychology. Adopting a life-span motivational perspective, we focus on adult development and maintain that, historically seen, adults nowadays have to take on a more active role in pursuing their goals due to the deregulation of the life course and increased life expectancy. This requires higher self-regulatory skills, particularly with increasing age. When self-regulation fails, people may postpone developmental goals and experience negative consequences. We propose research questions that might foster the understanding of procrastination from a life-span perspective.

URLhttps://doi.org/10.1080/15427609.2018.1489096
DOI10.1080/15427609.2018.1489096

Agreeableness, antagonism, and mental health across cultures

TitreAgreeableness, antagonism, and mental health across cultures
Type de publicationBook Chapter
Year of Publication2019
AuteursThalmayer, AGayle, Rossier, J
ÉditeurMiller, JD, Lynam, DR
Book TitleThe handbook of antagonism: Conceptualizations, assessment, consequences, and treatment of the low end of agreeableness
Pagination97–111
PublisherAcademic Press
Place PublishedLondon, UK
ISBN Number978-0-12-814627-9
Mots-clésAggression, agreeableness, Antisocial personality disorder, Big five, Cross-cultural psychology, Cultural psychology, Mental Disorders, Personality disorders, Personality traits, Psychopathy
Résumé

This chapter reviews evidence about Agreeableness and antagonism and their association with mental health across cultures. Agreeableness is a personality dimension defined in a Western context, but which corresponds to a reasonable degree with indigenous dimensions found in other cultural settings. Studies translating Western measures into other languages have found similar factor structures, but not evidence for scalar measurement invariance, which would allow for reliable comparison of scores across cultural and linguistic settings. Interestingly, however, lower average scores for men versus women appear to be more pronounced in industrialized nations with greater gender equity. Agreeableness appears to increase with age across cultures, in particular around the time of taking on adult financial responsibilities. The symptoms and disorders associated with antagonism, including conduct disorder, aggression, psychopathy, antisocial personality disorder, substance use disorders, and borderline personality disorder, generally appear to be globally comprehensible and diagnosable. However, specific symptom patterns can vary considerably, and rates of aggressive behavior and related symptoms appear to be more common in individualistic, industrialized cultures.

URLhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780128146279000074
DOI10.1016/B978-0-12-814627-9.00007-4

A value-centered approach to decent work

TitreA value-centered approach to decent work
Type de publicationBook Chapter
Year of Publication2018
AuteursMassoudi, K, Abessolo, M, Atitsogbe, KAmenyona, Banet, E, Bollmann, G, Dauwalder, J-P, Handschin, P, Maggiori, C, Masdonati, J, Rochat, S, Rossier, J
ÉditeurCohen-Scali, V, Pouyaud, J, Podgórny, M, Drabik-Podgórna, V, Aisenson, G, Bernaud, JLuc, Moumoula, IAbdou, Guichard, J
Book TitleInterventions in career design and education : Transformation for sustainable development and decent work
Series TitleLifelong Learning Book Series
Pagination93–110
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Place PublishedCham, Switzerland
ISBN Number978-3-319-91968-3
Mots-clésdecent work, Meaning of work, Relationships to working, Social utility, Value of work, Work values
Résumé

This chapter intends to propose an overarching perspective, based on a value-centered, life design-based conception of decent work, that could serve as a general framework for practitioners in their effort to elaborate and implement specific intervention methods and strategies. Highlighting the necessity to help our clients reach a decent occupational situation both from an objective and subjective viewpoint, we build on the ILO’s guidelines for the promotion of decent work and offer a review of the subjective factors involved in the human experience of working, such as meaning of work, relationships to working and work values. Finally, the limits of a narrow understanding of such a value-based approach are mentioned. In order to reconcile our clients’ aspirations and rights to attain decent and meaningful work, with our societies’ needs for fair and sustainable development, we posit that, even when working with individual subjectivity, we should strive for the promotion of ethical principles as well as foster collective responsibility and social utility.

URLhttps://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-91968-3_6
DOI10.1007/978-3-319-91968-3_6

Inequalities in access to higher education: Methodological and theoretical issues

TitreInequalities in access to higher education: Methodological and theoretical issues
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursGoastellec, G, Välimaa, J
JournalSocial Inclusion
Volume7
Nombre1
Pagination1–110
ISSN2183-2803
URLhttps://www.cogitatiopress.com/socialinclusion/issue/viewIssue/101/101

Échantillonner des populations rares. Une expérimentation du respondent driven sampling en milieu musical

TitreÉchantillonner des populations rares. Une expérimentation du respondent driven sampling en milieu musical
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuteursBataille, P, Perrenoud, M, Brändle, K
JournalSociologie
Volume9
Nombre2
Pagination1–18
ISSN2108-8845, 2108-6915
URLhttp://www.cairn.info/revue-sociologie-2018-2-page-197.htm
DOI10.3917/socio.092.0197

Culture, money attitudes and economic outcomes

TitreCulture, money attitudes and economic outcomes
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursHenchoz, C, Coste, T, Wernli, B
JournalSwiss Journal of Economics and Statistics
Volume155
Nombre1
Pagination1–13
ISSN2235-6282
Résumé

Using novel survey data, we examine attitudes towards money and to what extent they affect economic outcomes in Switzerland. We find that three main types of attitudes towards money co-exist: the prestige and power attitude, the money management attitude and the goal-oriented attitude. The distribution of these attitudes differs across Switzerland’s linguistic regions; all of them are more significant in the French-speaking part, compared to the German- and Italian-speaking parts of Switzerland.

URLhttps://doi.org/10.1186/s41937-019-0028-4
DOI10.1186/s41937-019-0028-4

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