Effect of childhood socioeconomic conditions on cancer onset in later life: an ambidirectional cohort study

TitreEffect of childhood socioeconomic conditions on cancer onset in later life: an ambidirectional cohort study
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
Auteursvan der Linden, BWA, Courvoisier, DS, Cheval, B, Sieber, S, Bracke, P, Guessous, I, Burton-Jeangros, C, Kliegel, M, Cullati, S
JournalInternational Journal of Public Health
Volume63
Nombre7
Pagination799–810
Date Publishedmay
ISSN1661-8556
Mots-clésageing, Cancer, life course, old age, Socioeconomic conditions
Résumé

Objectives Living in low socioeconomic conditions during childhood is associated with poor health outcomes in later life. Whether this link also applies to cancer is unclear. We examined whether childhood socioeconomic conditions (CSCs) are associated with cancer risk in later life and whether this effect remained after adjusting for adulthood socioeconomic conditions (ASCs). Methods Data for 26,431 individuals ≥ 50 years old included in SHARE were analysed. CSCs were constructed by using indicators of living conditions at age 10. ASC indicators were education, main occupation, and household income. Gender-stratified associations of CSCs with cancer onset (overall and by site) were assessed by Cox regression. Results In total, 2852 individuals were diagnosed with cancer. For both men and women, risk of overall cancer was increased for advantaged CSCs and remained so after adjusting for ASCs (hazard ratio = 1.36, 95% CI 1.10, 1.63, and 1.70, 95% CI 1.41, 2.07). Conclusions Advantaged CSCs are associated with an increased risk of overall cancer at older age, but results vary by cancer sites and sex. Participation in cancer screening or exposure to risk factors may differ by social conditions. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (10.1007/s00038-018-1111-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

URLhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6154039/
DOI10.1007/s00038-018-1111-9

Social and productive activities and health among partnered older adults: A couple-level analysis

TitreSocial and productive activities and health among partnered older adults: A couple-level analysis
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuteursLam, J, Bolano, D
JournalSocial Science & Medicine
Mots-clésactive ageing, Asia Pacific, health, Latent class models, Older couples
Résumé

Objectives: We theorize and test the health of older adults as a result of their activity engagement, as well as a product of their spouse's engagement. Method: We draw on 15 waves of couple-level data from the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey. Using responses of time engaged in nine different activities, we estimate Latent Class Models to describe activity profiles of partnered older adults. Given potential health selections into activity engagement, we lag older adults' activity engagement by one wave to examine its association with subsequent health. We then investigate associations between the lag of the spouse's activities with respondents' health, controlling for their own activity engagement at the previous wave. Result: We find four activity profiles for men, and three for women. Respondents who were predominantly engaged in community activities generally report better subsequent health. Beyond their own activity engagement, for both older men and women, having a partner who was also community engaged associate with better subsequent health, though for older women, there were little differences between having a husband who was community engaged or inactive. Discussion: Our findings highlight the value of considering activities of partnered older adults at the couple level.

URLhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277953618301837
DOI10.1016/j.socscimed.2018.04.016
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{:status: Advance online publication}

The heterogeneity of disability trajectories in later life: Dynamics of activities of daily living performance among nursing home residents

TitreThe heterogeneity of disability trajectories in later life: Dynamics of activities of daily living performance among nursing home residents
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuteursBolano, D, Berchtold, A, Burge, E
JournalJournal of Aging & Health
Mots-clésADL trajectories, longitudinal analysis, multi-state model, nursing home resident, variability disability trajectories
Résumé

Objective: This study investigated the variability in activities of daily living (ADL) trajectories among 6,155 nursing home residents using unique and rich observational data. Method: The impairment in ADL performance was considered as a dynamic process in a multi-state framework. Using an innovative mixture model, such states were not defined a priori but inferred from the data. Results: The process of change in functional health differed among residents. We identified four latent regimes: stability or slight deterioration, relevant change, variability, and recovery. Impaired body functions and poor physical performance were main risk factors associated with degradation in functional health. Discussion: The evolution of disability in later life is not completely gradual or homogeneous. Steep deterioration in functional health can be followed by periods of stability or even recovery. The current condition can be used to successfully predict the evolution of ADL allowing to set and target different care priorities and practices.

URLhttp://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0898264318776071
DOI10.1177/0898264318776071
Short TitleThe heterogeneity of disability trajectories in later life

Sequence analysis: Where are we, where wre we going?

TitreSequence analysis: Where are we, where wre we going?
Type de publicationBook Chapter
Year of Publication2018
AuteursRitschard, G, Studer, M
ÉditeurRitschard, G, Studer, M
Book TitleSequence analysis and related approaches : Innovative methods and applications.
Volume10
PublisherSpringer
Place PublishedCham, Switzerland
Notes

\{:status: Advance online publication\}

URLhttps://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007%2F978-3-319-95420-2_1
DOI10.1007/978-3-319-95420-2_1