Introduction - Ageing as a migrant: Vulnerabilities, agency and policy implications

TitreIntroduction - Ageing as a migrant: Vulnerabilities, agency and policy implications
Type de publicationBook Chapter
Year of Publication2019
AuteursCiobanu, ROana, Fokkema, T, Nedelcu, M
ÉditeurCiobanu, ROana, Fokkema, T, Nedelcu, M
Book TitleAgeing as a migrant: vulnerabilities, agency and policy implications
Edition1st Edition
Pagination1–18
PublisherRoutledge
Place PublishedOxford, United Kingdom
Mots-cléswww2
URLhttps://www.routledge.com/Ageing-as-a-Migrant-Vulnerabilities-Agency-and-Policy-Implications-1st/Ciobanu-Fokkema-Nedelcu/p/book/9780367180225

How executive functions are associated with event-based and time-based prospective memory during childhood

TitreHow executive functions are associated with event-based and time-based prospective memory during childhood
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursZuber, S, Mahy, CEV, Kliegel, M
JournalCognitive Development
Volume50
Pagination66–79
ISSN0885-2014
Mots-cléschildren, development, executive functions, Focal, Nonfocal, prospective memory, School-age, Time-based, www2
Résumé

A key developmental task of childhood is to gain autonomy and independence from parents and caregivers. Critical to this individualization process is the development of prospective memory (PM), the capacity to remember to carry out future intentions. In recent studies, children's PM performance has been associated with executive functions (EF). A closer inspection of the literature, however, suggests a differential impact of the three EF (updating, inhibition, and shifting) across different PM task types. The current study examined EF and PM capacities of 212 6- to 11-year-old children, examining for the first time both focal and nonfocal event-based PM tasks as well as a time-based PM task in a single sample. Results show that age-differences did not persist above and beyond age differences in children's executive resources. Specifically, updating predicted children's performance on all PM tasks, inhibition predicted performance on both event-based PM tasks, whereas shifting was specifically deployed by the nonfocal event-based task. Supplementary analyses of the time-based PM task illustrate how children monitor the progression of time and how preparatory processes support PM task performance. In sum, the current study presents the first comprehensive look at the specific role of age and three core EF in school-aged children's PM performance.

URLhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0885201418301394
DOI10.1016/j.cogdev.2019.03.001

Older immigrants living in Switzerland and ambivalence related to return around the retirement period

TitreOlder immigrants living in Switzerland and ambivalence related to return around the retirement period
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursBolzman, CA, Bridji, S
JournalInternational Journal of Comparative Sociology
Volume60
Nombre1-2
Pagination14–36
ISSN0020-7152
Mots-cléswww2
Résumé

The aim of this article is to explore the links between former guest workers’ attitudes toward return, as they approach retirement age, and ambivalence. More specifically, we seek answers to the following two questions: Do older immigrants modify their intentions toward return around the retirement period? If the answer is positive, we then ask: To which factors are these changes related when looking at intentions to return both before and after retirement? These questions have seldom been analyzed in the sociological literature, and their relation to ambivalence has not yet really been explored. After considering the state of the art, both from a sociology of migration perspective and through a life-course approach, we analyze empirically how older immigrants deal with the question of return. Our data come from a representative survey of approximately 300 older immigrants from Southern Europe (Italy, Portugal, and Spain), aged between 65 and 79 and living in urban Switzerland. Our findings show that (1) while a significant proportion of Italian and Spanish older migrants give up the idea of returning definitively to their country of origin and decide to establish their main residence in Switzerland, among the Portuguese, a significant minority wanted to return before retirement and are still planning to return, expecting to recover full citizenship in their “home” country; (2) changes with respect to return intentions mainly concern former blue-collar workers and white-collar employees; and (3) older immigrants who do not see migration as a positive decision demonstrate more ambivalence about return.

URLhttps://doi.org/10.1177/0020715218824634
DOI10.1177/0020715218824634

Publishers note: healthy minds 0–100 years: optimising the use of European brain imaging cohorts (“Lifebrain”)

TitrePublishers note: healthy minds 0–100 years: optimising the use of European brain imaging cohorts (“Lifebrain”)
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuteursWalhovd, KB, Fjell, AM, Westerhausen, R, Nyberg, L, Ebmeier, KP, Lindenberger, U, D. s-Faz, B, Baare, WFC, Siebner, HR, Henson, R, Drevon, CA, Knudsen, GP, Budin-Ljøsne, I, Penninx, BWJH, Ghisletta, P, Rogeberg, O, Tyler, L, Bertram, L, Consortium, L
JournalEuropean Psychiatry
Volume47
Pagination76–77
ISSN0924-9338
Mots-cléswww2
URLhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0924933817329875
DOI10.1016/j.eurpsy.2017.10.005

Stress and prospective memory: What is the role of cortisol?

TitreStress and prospective memory: What is the role of cortisol?
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursBallhausen, N, Kliegel, M, Rimmele, U
JournalNeurobiology of Learning and Memory
Volume161
Pagination169–174
ISSN1074-7427
Mots-clésCircadian rhythm, cortisol, Focality, prospective memory, stress, www2
Résumé

Studies investigating effects of acute stress on Prospective Memory (PM) so far yielded heterogeneous findings. Although results were commonly attributed to stress-induced changes in cortisol, past research did not disentangle effects of cortisol from the effects of sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activation and cognitive reappraisal. The present study therefore aimed at investigating the mere effect of cortisol on PM tasks that differently involve prefrontal brain regions (nonfocal vs. focal PM tasks) via a placebo-controlled oral pharmacological intake of 10 mg hydrocortisone mimicking physiological responses to stress. Contrary to our prediction, enhanced levels of cortisol did not affect PM accuracy and monitoring costs, neither for the focal nor the nonfocal PM tasks. These results suggest that changes of cortisol levels do not underlie potential stress effects on PM. Further exploratory results revealed that PM performance was higher in the 3 pm than in the 1 pm placebo group. This means that PM performance, independently of effects of cortisol, seem to vary throughout the day.

URLhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1074742719300772
DOI10.1016/j.nlm.2019.04.010

The effectiveness of a tactical games approach in the teaching of invasion games

TitreThe effectiveness of a tactical games approach in the teaching of invasion games
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursGouveia, ÉR, Gouveia, BR, Marques, A, Kliegel, M, Rodrigues, A, Prudente, J, Lopes, H, Ihle, A
JournalJournal of Physical Education and Sport
Volume19
Nombre3
Pagination962–970
ISSN22478051, 2247806X
Mots-cléswww2
Résumé

Purpose: The main purposes of this study were (a) to assess the effectiveness of the tactical games approach on students’ invasion game performance when compared to the technique-oriented approach, and (b) to investigate whether there was a difference in motor engagement time (MET) between the both pedagogical approaches. Method: The sample consisted of 79 students (13-16 years), allocated to the Intervention Group (IG) following the tactical games protocol, or to the Control Group (CG) following the technique-oriented approach. Psychomotor performance was assessed by the Game Performance Assessment Instrument. MET was assessed by direct observation. Results: Both pedagogical approaches promoted off- and on-the-ball movement over eight consecutive weeks. Comparing the effectiveness of these two teaching approaches, no difference was found. However, collapsed across the two time points, students had better on-the-ball decision-making in the tactical games approach, as well as more MET. Conclusion: Continued replication of this research including long term follow-up is necessary to further strengthen the generalizability of these findings across alternative school contexts.

DOI10.7752/jpes.2019.s3139

The longitudinal relationship of perceived stress predicting subsequent decline in executive functioning in old age is attenuated in individuals with greater cognitive reserve

TitreThe longitudinal relationship of perceived stress predicting subsequent decline in executive functioning in old age is attenuated in individuals with greater cognitive reserve
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursIhle, A, Rimmele, U, Oris, M, Maurer, J, Kliegel, M
JournalGerontology
Pagination1–9
ISSN0304-324X, 1423-0003
Mots-cléswww2
Résumé

\textbf\textitBackground: Cognitively stimulating activities contribute to the accumulation of cognitive reserve that is proposed to be instrumental for maintaining cognitive functioning in aging. Adopting a novel, more general conceptual perspective including models of vulnerability, we argue that cognitive reserve may modify the longitudinal association between perceived stress and the rate of subsequent decline in executive functioning. \textbf\textitObjective: The present study set out to investigate the longitudinal relationship between perceived stress and subsequent decline in executive functioning over 6 years as measured through performance changes in the Trail Making Test (TMT) and whether this longitudinal relationship differed by key markers of cognitive reserve (education, occupation, and leisure activities), taking into account age, sex, and chronic diseases as covariates. \textbf\textitMethods: We used latent change score modeling based on longitudinal data from 897 older adults tested on TMT parts A and B in two waves 6 years apart. Mean age in the first wave was 74.33 years. Participants reported information on perceived stress, education, occupation, leisure activities, and chronic diseases. \textbf\textitResults: The longitudinal relationship between greater perceived stress in the first wave of data collection and steeper subsequent decline in executive functioning over 6 years was significantly reduced in individuals who had pursued a higher frequency of leisure activities in the first wave. \textbf\textitConclusion: The longitudinal relationship between perceived stress and subsequent decline in executive functioning may be attenuated in individuals who have accumulated greater cognitive reserve through an engaged lifestyle. Implications for current cognitive reserve and gerontological research are discussed.

URLhttps://www.karger.com/Article/FullText/501293
DOI10.1159/000501293
Identifiant (ID) PubMed31352460

The role of super-diversity in shaping the perception of and services for older migrants

TitreThe role of super-diversity in shaping the perception of and services for older migrants
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursCiobanu, ROana
JournalJournal of Aging Studies
Volume50
Pagination100792
ISSN08904065
Mots-cléswww2
URLhttps://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0890406519302580
DOI10.1016/j.jaging.2019.100792

A longitudinal study of relations among adolescents’ self-esteem, general self-efficacy, career adaptability, and life satisfaction

TitreA longitudinal study of relations among adolescents’ self-esteem, general self-efficacy, career adaptability, and life satisfaction
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursMarcionetti, J, Rossier, J
JournalJournal of Career Development
ISSN0894-8453, 1556-0856
Résumé

Self-esteem, general self-efficacy, and career adaptability, which include career concern, control, curiosity, and confidence, are important resources for adolescents who are required to make important educational and professional choices. No studies have investigated how these resources codevelop over time and their impact on life satisfaction. To more precisely study this codevelopment and the impact of these resources on well-being, 357 Swiss adolescents were assessed 3 times during the last 17 months of compulsory school. The results showed an interrelationship between career adaptability and self-efficacy and a unidirectional effect of self-esteem on life satisfaction over time. They also highlighted the importance of career adapt-ability concerns for predicting the other three career adapt-abilities. Overall, the results suggested that in adolescents, higher levels of career adaptability may favor higher levels of general self-efficacy and that higher levels of self-esteem may induce higher levels of life satisfaction. Implications for practice are discussed.

URLhttp://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0894845319861691
DOI10.1177/0894845319861691

Who cares? Effects of social approach and avoidance motivation on responsiveness to others

TitreWho cares? Effects of social approach and avoidance motivation on responsiveness to others
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursNikitin, J, Freund, AM
JournalPersonality and Social Psychology Bulletin
Volume45
Nombre2
Pagination182–195
ISSN0146-1672
Résumé

Responsiveness to others (i.e., our understanding, validation, and support of important aspects of others) significantly contributes to positive social relationships. In the present research, we found evidence that responsiveness has motivational origins. In two experiments, participants who were approaching positive social outcomes had a higher level of responsiveness compared with participants who were avoiding negative social outcomes. A third experiment disentangled the roles of motivation and situation valence. Positive (compared with negative) social situations were associated with higher approach motivation, lower avoidance motivation, and a higher level of responsiveness. However, within a given situation, both approach and avoidance motivation were associated with a higher level of responsiveness. This association was even stronger in negative situations, suggesting that both approach and avoidance motivation might be ways of behaving responsively in potentially difficult social situations. The effects were independent of relationship closeness and partly weaker in older compared with younger adults.

URLhttps://doi.org/10.1177/0146167218781335
DOI10.1177/0146167218781335

The motivational power of the happy face

TitreThe motivational power of the happy face
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursNikitin, J, Freund, AM
JournalBrain Sciences
Volume9
Nombre1
Pagination6
ISSN2076-3425
Résumé

{People who are cheerful have better social relationships. This might be the case because happy faces communicate an invitation to interact. Thus, happy faces might have a strong motivational effect on others. We tested this hypothesis in a set of four studies. Study 1 (N = 94) showed that approach reactions to happy faces are faster than other reactions to happy or angry faces. Study 2 (N = 99) found the same effect when comparing reactions to happy faces with reactions to disgusted faces. Supporting the notion that this effect is related to motivation, habitual social approach motivation intensified the motivational effect of happy faces (Study 3

URLhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6356968/
DOI10.3390/brainsci9010006
Identifiant (ID) PubMed30621081

Social motives, attributions and expectations as predictors of the decision to participate in a speed-dating event

TitreSocial motives, attributions and expectations as predictors of the decision to participate in a speed-dating event
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursNikitin, J, Gong, X, Schoch, S, Freund, AM
JournalMotivation and Emotion
Volume43
Nombre4
Pagination610–624
ISSN1573-6644
Mots-clésAttributions, Expectations, motivation, Relationship initiation, Speed-dating
Résumé

Two studies investigated the role of dispositional social approach and avoidance motives (i.e., what people generally desire and fear in social relationships) for the decision to participate in a speed-dating event. In a sample of N = 205 college students (Study 1), approach motives were positively and avoidance motives negatively associated with the decision to participate in a speed-dating event. Focusing on the underlying processes, Study 2 (N = 153) showed that approach and avoidance motives were differentially associated with attributions of acceptance and rejection experienced in a previous speed-dating scenario. The higher participants’ approach motives were, the more they attributed acceptance to internal, stable, and global causes. Conversely, the higher participants’ avoidance motives were, the more they attributed rejection to internal, stable, and global causes. Attributions, in turn, predicted expectations for an upcoming speed-dating event, and positive expectations positively predicted decision for participating in the speed-dating event. Thus, what people generally desire and fear in social relationships influence relationship initiation through differential attributions of previous social success and failure and thereby expectations for the upcoming social events.

URLhttps://doi.org/10.1007/s11031-019-09762-0
DOI10.1007/s11031-019-09762-0

Faking to fit in: Applicants’ response strategies to match organizational culture.

TitreFaking to fit in: Applicants’ response strategies to match organizational culture.
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursRoulin, N, Krings, F
JournalJournal of Applied Psychology
ISSN1939-1854
URLhttps://psycnet.apa.org/fulltext/2019-34224-001.pdf
DOI10.1037/apl0000431

Perceived job insecurity and self-rated health: Testing reciprocal relationships in a five-wave study

TitrePerceived job insecurity and self-rated health: Testing reciprocal relationships in a five-wave study
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursUrbanaviciute, I, De Witte, H, Rossier, J
JournalSocial Science & Medicine
Volume233
Pagination201–207
ISSN0277-9536
Mots-clésCross-lagged panel model, job insecurity, Negative cycle, self-rated health, Workplace vulnerabilities
Résumé

Rationale The present study aims to investigate the pattern of cross-lagged relationships between job insecurity and self-rated health over a period of five years. While health complaints are usually seen as one of the detrimental outcomes of job insecurity, the question of the direction of the job insecurity-health relationship has not yet been fully resolved. Only a few longitudinal studies have explicitly aimed to test the possibility of reciprocal or reverse effects, and even fewer studies have used multi-wave designs to examine the pattern of these relationships. Objective The current study aims to address this gap by testing how cross-lagged relationships between job insecurity and self-rated health status unfold over time. Method We conducted this study with a sample of the working population in Switzerland (N = 928), using the data from five consecutive measurement occasions, each separated by a one year lag. Cross-lagged structural equation modelling was performed to examine the direction of the effects. Results The results revealed an interchangeable direction of the relationship between job insecurity and health over time. T1 job insecurity predicted lower ratings of health at T2, which then predicted job insecurity at T3, which, in turn, was related to lower health at T4. The only exception was observed in the last follow-up (i.e., T4 to T5), where no evidence of cross-lagged relationships between job insecurity and self-rated health was found. Conclusions These findings contribute to the literature suggesting that, not only may job insecurity predict later health impairment, but that in some cases, the reverse may be possible too. Researchers and policy makers need to consider this important message because the observed lagged reciprocal effects between job insecurity and health seem to form a negative cycle over time, thereby implying a dual process in the development of workplace vulnerabilities.

URLhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277953619303090
DOI10.1016/j.socscimed.2019.05.039

Development and initial validation of a multidimensional questionnaire on the relationship to work (RWQ)

TitreDevelopment and initial validation of a multidimensional questionnaire on the relationship to work (RWQ)
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursFournier, G, Lachance, L, Viviers, S, Lahrizi, IZineb, Goyer, L, Masdonati, J
JournalInternational Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance
ISSN1573-1782
Mots-clésInitial validation, Questionnaire development, Relationship to work
Résumé

The paper presents first the theoretical foundations used to develop a pre-experimental version of a questionnaire on relationship to work, and then the four stages of its initial validation leading to an experimental version. These stages included: (1) Defining the dimensions and sub-dimensions of the relationship to work concept; (2) Operationalizing the dimensions and sub-dimensions and creating the items; (3) Verifying the face and content validity and developing the pre-experimental questionnaire; (4) Testing the pre-experimental questionnaire with 550 workers and 538 students, assessing its psychometric properties and elaborating the experimental questionnaire.

URLhttps://doi.org/10.1007/s10775-019-09397-0
DOI10.1007/s10775-019-09397-0

Reaping the benefits and avoiding the risks: Unrealistic optimism in the health domain

TitreReaping the benefits and avoiding the risks: Unrealistic optimism in the health domain
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursHanoch, Y, Rolison, J, Freund, AM
JournalRisk Analysis
Volume39
Nombre4
Pagination792–804
ISSN1539-6924
Mots-clésbenefits, medical, numeracy, risks, unrealistic optimism
Résumé

People's perceptions of benefits and risks play a key role in their acceptance or rejection of medical interventions, yet these perceptions may be poorly calibrated. This online study with N = 373 adults aged 19–76 years focused on unrealistic optimism in the health domain. Participants indicated how likely they were to experience benefits and risks associated with medical conditions and completed objective and subjective numeracy scales. Participants exhibited optimistic views about the likelihood of experiencing the benefits and the side effects of treatment options described in the scenarios. Objective and subjective numeracy were not associated with more accurate ratings. Moreover, participants’ underestimation of the risks was significantly greater than their overestimation of the benefits. From an applied perspective, these results suggest that clinicians may need to ensure that patients do not underestimate risks of medical interventions, and that they convey realistic expectations about the benefits that can be obtained with certain procedures.

URLhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/risa.13204
DOI10.1111/risa.13204

A motivational perspective on academic procrastination: Goal focus affects how students perceive activities while procrastinating.

TitreA motivational perspective on academic procrastination: Goal focus affects how students perceive activities while procrastinating.
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of PublicationSubmitted
AuteursKaftan, OJ, Freund, AM
JournalMotivation Science
Volume5
Nombre2
Pagination135–156
ISSN2333-8121
URLhttps://psycnet.apa.org/record/2018-32060-001
DOI10.1037/mot0000110

When the fun Is over: Toward a motivational account of exhaustion and recovery

TitreWhen the fun Is over: Toward a motivational account of exhaustion and recovery
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursCardini, BB, Freund, AM
JournalEuropean Psychologist
Pagination1–15
ISSN1016-9040
Résumé

. How do we know when an activity has exhausted us or helped us recover? In this paper, we present a motivational approach to exhaustion and recovery that takes into account the multidimensional nature of the constructs. The account details three psychological processes that may – individually and in interaction – underlie exhaustion and recovery. Specifically, we propose that changes in mood, subjective time perception, and opportunity costs experienced during an ongoing effortful or relaxing activity indicate a person’s momentary degree of exhaustion and recovery and impact the decision of whether the person should continue or disengage from the activity at hand. Addressing developmental changes across adulthood, we present two opposing hypotheses on how younger and older adults may differ in their experiences of exhaustion and recovery: (i) Older adults may experience an accelerated subjective time perception compared to younger adults and may thus feel less exhausted (more recovered) than younger adults after spending an identical amount of time engaged in an effortful (relaxing) activity. (ii) Older adults may be more sensitive toward increasing opportunity costs experienced during an effortful or relaxing activity and may therefore feel exhausted or recovered faster than younger adults.

URLhttps://econtent.hogrefe.com/doi/10.1027/1016-9040/a000361
DOI10.1027/1016-9040/a000361

Individual differences in habitual social goals and daily well-being: The role of age and relationship closeness

TitreIndividual differences in habitual social goals and daily well-being: The role of age and relationship closeness
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursNikitin, J, Freund, AM
JournalEuropean Journal of Personality
Volume33
Nombre3
Pagination337–358
ISSN1099-0984
Mots-clésage differences, approach goals, avoidance goals, daily well-being, habitual social goals, relationship closeness
Résumé

There is a robust evidence that social approach goals (i.e. approach of positive social outcomes) have positive consequences and social avoidance goals (i.e. avoidance of negative social outcomes) have negative consequences for subjective well-being in young adulthood. Little is known about individual differences in social goals in later life. The current diary study with young (n = 212), middle-aged (n = 232), and older adults (n = 229) tested––and supported––the hypotheses that age (i) differentially predicts the strength of habitual approach and avoidance goals in close and peripheral relationships and (ii) moderates the relation of approach and avoidance goals in peripheral (but not close) relationships and daily outcomes (subjective well-being, subjective health, and satisfaction with social encounters). Older adults compared to younger adults reported higher levels of avoidance goals in peripheral (but not close) relationships. Younger adults who reported high levels of approach goals and older adults who reported high levels of avoidance goals in peripheral relationships experienced the most positive daily outcomes. In addition, social goals moderated some of the associations between (positive and negative) daily interactions and daily outcomes. Results underscore the importance of the closeness of social partners for individual differences in social goals across adulthood. © 2019 European Association of Personality Psychology

URLhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/per.2190
DOI10.1002/per.2190

Perception of risk for older adults: Differences in evaluations for self versus others and across risk domains

TitrePerception of risk for older adults: Differences in evaluations for self versus others and across risk domains
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuteursRolison, JJ, Hanoch, Y, Freund, AM
JournalGerontology
ISSN0304-324X, 1423-0003
Résumé

\textbf\textitBackground and Objectives: Proxy decision-making may be flawed by inaccurate perceptions of risk. This may be particularly true when older adults are the targets of the decisions, given the pervasive negative stereotypes about older adults. \textbf\textitMethods: In study 1, individuals aged 18- to 87 years (as target persons) as well as one of their close social partners (as informants) reported on the risks they perceived for the target person in various life domains. Study 2 additionally explored potential differences in how people make risky decisions on behalf of younger and older adult targets. Younger (age 18–35 years) and older (age 60–81 years) adults (as target persons of the risk evaluations) as well as informants reported on risk perceptions and the likelihood of risk-taking for health, financial, and social scenarios concerning the target persons. Congruence between self-rated and informant-rated risk perceptions and risk-taking were computed on a dyadic as well as a group level. \textbf\textitResults: Informants’ risk perceptions were positively associated with the risks their partners perceived for themselves. Informants and their partners agreed that social risks vary little across adulthood, but they disagreed in terms of recreational, financial, and health risks, and in terms of the decisions they would make. \textbf\textitConclusion: Family members, partners, and close friends are sensitive to vulnerabilities of their social partners, but in some domains and according to their partners’ age they perceive a greater (or smaller) risk than their partners perceive for themselves. In situations requiring surrogate decision-making, people may decide differently from how their social partners would decide for themselves.

URLhttps://www.karger.com/Article/FullText/494352
DOI10.1159/000494352

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