DAISIE - Country report: Sweden

TitleDAISIE - Country report: Sweden
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsKrekula, C
JournalLIVES Working paper
Volume77.6
Pagination1-30
Date Published05/2019
ISSN2296-1658
KeywordsAgeism in the labour market, Extended working life, gender mainstreaming, gendered labour market, precarious labour
Abstract

The DAISIE project explores the gendered impacts of policies and practices aimed at extending working life (EWL) in five contrasting national settings (the Czech Republic, Ireland, Sweden, Switzerland and the UK), using a mixed methods research design inspired by insights from lifecourse and gender studies. The project addresses two significant and timely issues: labour market participation in later life and the influence of labour market and family trajectories on the experiences of older workers in different national and occupational contexts. This report explores the issue of extending working life in the Swedish context. It begins by discussing the Swedish gender equality politics, which follows by a presentation of the pension system, pension trends and obstacles against an extended working life. The processes towards an extended working life illustrates the difficulties in implementing gender equality in practice. In the Swedish debate on raised retirement age, older women’s and men’s equal opportunity to work into old age is not identified as a core issue, although this is an essential goal of the general gender equality policy in Sweden. Nor has the gender segregated labour market been emphasised to any great extent, despite being at the heart of gender inequalities in terms of wages, pensions and sick leave and parental leave. It is further shown that the argument for an extended working life is mainly based on demographic statistics and economic arguments about the sustainability of the Swedish welfare and pension systems, while organisational factors, such as ageism and age norms in work organisations have not highlighted as a real obstacle to older people’s participation in working life. Finally, it is argued that the Swedish gender equality project also has to include the older age groups and that the question of extended working life is an example of contemporary gender equality issues.

DOI10.12682/lives.2296-1658.2019.77.6

DAISIE - OECD Policy Recommendations on Extending Working Lives

TitleDAISIE - OECD Policy Recommendations on Extending Working Lives
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsLéime, ÁNí
JournalLIVES Working paper
Volume77.5
Pagination1-15
Date Published05/2019
ISSN2296-1658
KeywordsExtended working life, gender, OECD, Pensions
Abstract

This Working Paper presents an overview of the OECD’s approach to extended working life, in relation to pensions and employment policy. It briefly outlines the role of the OECD and traces the evolution of OECD policy recommendations on extended working life from 2005 onwards to 2018. It discusses how the OECD recommends policies targeted at governments in terms of pension reforms including raising state pension age and linking pension amounts more closely to earnings, and anti-discrimination legislation; at employers and at improving the employability of older workers. The series of publications Pensions at a Glance, published biennially from 2005 to 2017 contains very little explicit reference to gender inequalities in pensions or indeed to
women, apart from some references to family responsibilities. The 2015 report included a chapter on how incomplete careers affect pension entitlements. The critique of the OECD’s approach from a gender perspective in the academic literature is discussed. It is recommended that the OECD conduct gender-proofing to assess the implications of extended working life policy (OECD, 2017b).

DOI10.12682/lives.2296-1658.2019.77.5

DAISIE - Country report: Czech Republic

TitleDAISIE - Country report: Czech Republic
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsKřížková, A, Dudová, R
Secondary AuthorsRašticová, M, Bédiová, M
JournalLIVES Working paper
Volume77.4
Pagination1-23
Date Published05/2019
ISSN2296-1658
Keywordsageing, Czech Republic, employment, Extending working life, gender, Pensions, retirement
Abstract

Policies aimed at extending working lives (EWL) have only been introduced in the Czech Republic over the last 15 years. This report first describes the situation of the 50+ age group in the Czech labour market. In the second part, it maps retirement, employment, pension and other relevant policies in the Czech Republic as well as policy documents supporting active ageing. In
conclusion, the authors suggest that the real or potential impact of EWL policies on the situation of women and men aged 50+ should be approached from an intersectional gender and age
perspective.

DOI10.12682/lives.2296-1658.2019.77.4

DAISIE - Country report: United Kingdom

TitleDAISIE - Country report: United Kingdom
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsJandrić, J, Airey, L, Loretto, W
Secondary AuthorsVickerstaff, S
JournalLIVES Working paper
Volume77.3
Pagination1-32
Date Published05/2019
ISSN2296-1658
KeywordsEmployment policy, Extended working life, gender, Pensions, retirement, State pension age, UK
Abstract

In recent decades, the extension of working life has become a priority for policy makers in the UK. An ageing population, combined with steady increases in life expectancy, have led to a dramatic growth in the proportion of adults above State Pension age, alongside a shrinkage in the number of working-age adults. This has led to government concerns regarding not only the cost of funding State Pensions, but also the skills shortages that have resulted from the loss of older adults from the labour market via retirement. Successive UK governments have implemented a range of measures designed to encourage individuals to continue in paid work for longer. The tone of policy discourse has shifted towards the individual, with a growing emphasis on the need for individual workers to take responsibility for financial planning for their own retirement.

In this report, we consider and discuss extended working life (EWL) policies in light of current academic research. We start by presenting statistical data on UK employment rates, in order to outline the trends in age, gender and employment in recent decades. We then discuss six policy areas related to extending working life. First, we compare women and men’s participation in the labour market over the life-course. Second, policy changes related to age are discussed, including age discrimination legislation and changes to State Pension age. Third, we consider changes to social security benefits. Fourth, we provide an overview of the UK pensions system, including recent changes to the system, the introduction of occupational pensions and autoenrolment, and opportunities for combining pensions and working. Fifth, we discuss policies related to family and caring (including grandparents’ leave). Sixth, we consider flexible work policies in the context of later-life working. The report concludes with a discussion on the potential gaps in research on extending working lives in the UK national context.

DOI10.12682/lives.2296-1658.2019.77.3

DAISIE - Country report: Ireland

TitleDAISIE - Country report: Ireland
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsLéime, ÁNí, Duvvury, N
JournalLIVES Working paper
Volume77.2
Pagination1-28
Date Published05/2019
ISSN2296-1658
KeywordsEmployment policy, Extended working life, gender, health, Pensions, precarity
Abstract

This paper presents a discussion of the gender and health impacts of extended working life policies in Ireland. It gives an overview of gendered working patterns in Ireland, focusing particularly on older workers and giving an outline of some of the historical policies that affected women earlier in their working lives, adopting a lifecourse approach in order to account for gender pension and unemployment inequalities. This is followed by an overview of the pension system in Ireland and of gendered patterns and level of coverage. This is followed by a discussion of the policies that have been introduced to extend working life and related pension reforms including health related employment measures and family friendly policies and the gendered division of care labour. There is a brief synopsis of the media debate in Ireland on extended working life policies and pension reforms particularly those related to gender. There is a discussion of the policy and academic literature in gender and extended working life including that on health and precarious employment.

DOI10.12682/lives.2296-1658.2019.77.2

DAISIE - Country report: Switzerland

TitleDAISIE - Country report: Switzerland
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsLe Feuvre, N
JournalLIVES Working paper
Volume77.1
Pagination1-45
Date Published05/2019
ISSN2296-1658
Keywordsageing, discrimination, employment, Extending working life, gender, Pensions, retirement, Switzerland, working conditions
Abstract

The DAISIE project explores the gendered impacts of policies and practices aimed at extending working life (EWL) in five contrasting national settings (the Czech Republic, Ireland, Sweden, Switzerland and the UK), using a mixed methods research design inspired by insights from lifecourse
and gender studies. The project addresses two significant and timely issues: labour market participation in later life and the influence of labour market and family trajectories on the experiences of older workers in different national and occupational contexts.

This report explores the issue of extending working life in the Swiss context. It begins be mapping the employment patterns of older workers (50+), insisting on the differences in employment histories, working conditions and the transition to employment that are associated with the normative expectations of the dominant “modified male breadwinner” Swiss gender model. The report then goes on to present the three-tier Swiss pension regime and to analyse the consequences of recent – or proposed - policy reforms to this system. It insists on the huge pension gender gap in the Swiss context and analyses the consequences of this gap for the experiences of older workers from different social backgrounds.

The report concludes by summing up the important features of the EWL debate in Switzerland from a gender perspective and identifying gaps in the current state of research on this topic.

DOI10.12682/lives.2296-1658.2019.77.1