Direct, extended, and mass-mediated contact with immigrants in Italy: their associations with emotions, prejudice, and humanity perceptions: Different types of intergroup contact and prejudice

TitleDirect, extended, and mass-mediated contact with immigrants in Italy: their associations with emotions, prejudice, and humanity perceptions: Different types of intergroup contact and prejudice
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsVisintin, EPaolo, Voci, A, Pagotto, L, Hewstone, M
JournalJournal of Applied Social Psychology
Volume47
Number4
Pagination175–194
ISSN00219029
Keywordsdirect contact, extended contact, infrahumanization, intergroup contact, intergroup emotions, mass media, negative contact, positive contact, prejudice
Abstract

Two correlational studies investigated the associations between different forms of intergroup
contact, on the one hand, and Italians’ prejudice and humanity attributions toward immigrants
in Italy, on the other. Study 1 examined the effects of direct contact, extended contact and
parasocial contact through mass-media, assessing separately contact through TV news and
newspapers and contact through entertainment programs. Study 2 analyzed the distinct effects
of positive and negative episodes of the contact forms considered in Study 1. Across the
studies, we tested the mediational role of intergroup anxiety, empathy, and trust. Overall,
results showed the importance of taking into account different forms of contact and
considering the emotional processes during contact experiences to understand intergroup
attitudes.

URLhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/jasp.12423
DOI10.1111/jasp.12423

How positive and negative contact relate to attitudes towards Roma: Comparing majority and high-status minority perspectives

TitleHow positive and negative contact relate to attitudes towards Roma: Comparing majority and high-status minority perspectives
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsVisintin, EPaolo, Green, EGT, Pereira, A, Miteva, P
JournalJournal of Community & Applied Social Psychology
Volume27
Number3
Pagination240–252
ISSN10529284
Keywordsintergroup contact, intergroup emotions, interminority relations, negative contact, prejudice, Roma
Abstract

Intergroup contact scholars have recently called for analyzing the effects of negative intergroup contact. In response to this call, we examined the correlates of positive and negative contact with one of the most stigmatized ethnic minorities, that is, Roma. We conducted a study in Bulgaria considering the point of view of the ethnic Bulgarian majority (n = 516) and of Bulgarian Turks (n = 274), an ethnic minority with higher status compared to Roma. Regression analyses showed that positive contact was associated with reduced prejudice and more support for pro‐Roma policies, while negative contact revealed the opposite pattern. These associations did not differ between ethnic Bulgarians and Bulgarian Turks. Moreover, positive and negative intergroup emotions mediated the relationships between positive and negative contact on the one hand and prejudice and policy support on the other. Our study highlights the importance of emotional processes involved in positive and negative intergroup contact experiences and encourages future research to analyze how absolute versus relative status differences shape the effects of positive and negative contact in complex hierarchical societies.

URLhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/casp.2309
DOI10.1002/casp.2309
Short TitleHow positive and negative contact relate to attitudes towards Roma

The role of multicultural and colorblind ideologies and typicality in imagined contact interventions

TitleThe role of multicultural and colorblind ideologies and typicality in imagined contact interventions
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsVisintin, EPaolo, Birtel, MDenise, Crisp, RJ
JournalInternational Journal of Intercultural Relations
Volume59
Pagination1–8
ISSN01471767
Abstract

Recent studies have demonstrated that simply imagining a positive interaction with an outgroup member reduces prejudice, especially if the outgroup member is typical of the whole outgroup. In this research, we tested how a multicultural vs. colorblind mindset might impact the efficacy of imagined contact with a typical or atypical outgroup member. Specifically, we tested the interactive effects between ideologies (multiculturalism vs. colorblindness) and the typicality of the outgroup member (typical vs. atypical) in the imagined encounter. Results revealed that participants exposed to the multicultural ideology who imagined an encounter with an atypical outgroup member expressed fewer positive perceptions (warmth and competence) toward both primary and secondary outgroups compared with respondents exposed to the multicultural ideology who imagined an interaction with a typical outgroup member, and compared with respondents exposed to a colorblind ideology (irrespective of typicality of the outgroup member). The study highlights the importance of considering the interaction between cultural ideologies and typicality during intergroup contact when designing interventions aimed at promoting positive intergroup perceptions.

URLhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0147176716301535
DOI10.1016/j.ijintrel.2017.04.010

Competition- and identity-based roots of anti-immigration prejudice among individuals with and without an immigrant background

TitleCompetition- and identity-based roots of anti-immigration prejudice among individuals with and without an immigrant background
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsSarrasin, O, Green, EGT, Bolzman, C, Visintin, EPaolo, Politi, E
JournalInternational Review of Social Psychology
Volume31
Number1
Pagination1-12
ISSN2397-8570
Keywordsimmigration; prejudice; immigrant background; threat; national identification; nationalism
Abstract

Most social psychological research on anti-immigration prejudice has examined the point of view of the national ingroup—generally defined as the citizens of the country under consideration—toward immigrant outgroups. Threat perceptions related to immigration as well as national identification have been shown to underlie negative attitudes. Whether these two factors also explain attitudes among individuals sharing characteristics with the immigrants remains largely unstudied. To fill this gap, the present research examines perceived threat, national identification, and different facets of anti-immigration prejudice among Swiss residents with and without an immigrant background. Results of a path model conducted on data from the International Social Survey Programme 2013 (N = 1,198) showed that, as expected, natives reported higher levels of prejudice than both citizens of foreign descent and immigrants. While group differences in prejudice were in part explained by differences in threat perceptions, the role of national identification was more nuanced. Altogether, these findings suggest that social psychological research should go beyond simplistic “national ingroup vs. immigrant outgroup” conceptualisations when examining anti-immigration prejudice.

URLhttp://www.rips-irsp.com/articles/10.5334/irsp.155/
DOI10.5334/irsp.155

National identification counteracts the sedative effect of positive intergroup contact on ethnic activism

TitleNational identification counteracts the sedative effect of positive intergroup contact on ethnic activism
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsPereira, A, Green, EGT, Visintin, EPaolo
JournalFrontiers in Psychology
Volume8
Pagination1-10
ISSN1664-1078
Keywordsethnic identification, intergroup contact, minority activism, national identification, Roma
Abstract

Positive intergroup contact with socially and economically advantaged national majorities has been shown to reduce ethnic identification among minorities, thereby undermining ethnic minority activism. This finding implies that ethnic identity is the relevant social identity driving ethnic minorities’ struggle for equality. We argue that the study of the “sedating” effect of positive intergroup contact for minorities should be more nuanced. The existence of multiple and sometimes interplaying social identities can foster a reinterpretation of the meaning of “ethnic” activism. This study therefore examines how the interplay of ethnic and national identities shapes the sedating effect of contact on minority activism. We expect national identification to buffer the sedated activism resulting from reduced ethnic identification. That is, the mediation from intergroup contact to reduced ethnic activism through weakened ethnic identification is expected to be moderated by national identification. With survey data from Bulgaria, we investigated support for ethnic activism among Bulgarian Roma (N D 320) as a function of their contact with the national majority as well as their degree of ethnic and national identification. The predicted moderated mediation was revealed: a negative indirect relationship between contact and activism through decreased ethnic identification occurred among Roma with low national identification, whereas no sedating effect occurred among Roma identifying strongly as members of the Bulgarian nation. We discuss the meaning of national identification for the Roma minority, who experience harsh discrimination in countries where they have been historically settled, as well as convergence of these findings with work on dual identification. We highlight the role of interacting social identities in mobilizing resources for activism and the importance of adopting a critical view on ethnic discourse when studying activism in both traditional and immigrant minorities.

URLhttp://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00477/full
DOI10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00477

Collective victimhood and acknowledgement of outgroup suffering across history: Majority and minority perspectives

TitleCollective victimhood and acknowledgement of outgroup suffering across history: Majority and minority perspectives
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsGreen, EGT, Visintin, EPaolo, Hristova, A, Bozhanova, A, Pereira, A, Staerklé, C
JournalEuropean Journal of Social Psychology
Volume47
Number2
Pagination228–240
ISSN00462772
Keywordsacknowledgment of outgroup suffering, Bulgaria, collective guilt, collective victimhood, group-based forgiveness, historical memory
Abstract

This paper examines how temporally differentiated representations of ingroup victimhood and acknowledgment of outgroup suffering relate to present intergroup attitudes. A mixed‐methods research was conducted in Bulgaria where both the ethnic majority and the Bulgarian Turkish minority can be viewed as victims and perpetrators in the past. Multigroup path models (Study 1) revealed that for the majority (N = 192) collective victimhood was positively related to social distance through reduced forgiveness and through reduced collective guilt for a different historical era. Acknowledgment of outgroup suffering, in turn, was associated with reduced social distance through heightened guilt and through forgiveness for another era. Among the Bulgarian Turks (N = 160), the result pattern differed. Collective victimhood was unrelated to forgiveness. Moreover, the relationship between guilt and social distance was positive. Semi‐directive interviews (Study 2) revealed different meanings attributed to the events by the two groups. The impact of intertwined historical representations on current‐day prejudice is discussed in light of power asymmetry between groups.

URLhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/ejsp.2237
DOI10.1002/ejsp.2237

Deliberative democracy in the real world, the contribution of the capability approach

TitleDeliberative democracy in the real world, the contribution of the capability approach
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsBonvin, J-M, Laruffa, F
JournalInternational Review of Sociology
Volume28
Number2
Pagination216–233
ISSN0390-6701, 1469-9273
KeywordsCapability approach; positional objectivity; conversion; markets; deliberative democracy
Abstract

Drawing on Amartya Sen’s writings, this article presents the capability approach to democracy and shows its relevance for the sociological reflection and research on democratic processes conceived as ways to convert individual preferences into collective norms or decisions. Two moments are key in this respect: the formation of individual preferences and their translation into collective norms in the course of public debates. The initial sections present Sen’s conception of democracy, particularly emphasizing its articulation with the notions of ‘positional objectivity’ and ‘conversion’. Then, this conception is compared with two other mechanisms that may be used to coordinate individual decisions or preferences, namely the market and idealistic views on deliberative democracy. The article emphasizes how the capability approach departs from these two conceptions with regard to the two key concepts of capacity to aspire and capability for voice. The final section shows how Sen’s notion of democracy may open up a new field for research, namely the sociological investigation of the informational (or knowledge) basis of democracy.

URLhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03906701.2018.1477101
DOI10.1080/03906701.2018.1477101

Analyzing inequality and disadvantadge from a capability perspective

TitleAnalyzing inequality and disadvantadge from a capability perspective
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsBonvin, J-M, Beuret, B, Dahmen, S
EditorOtto, H-U, Egdell, V, Bonvin, J-M, Atzmüller, R, Kepler, J
Book TitleEmpowering Young People in Disempowering Times
Chapter1
Pagination23–38
PublisherEdward Elgar
Place PublishedCheltenham, UK

Improving the quality of life of disadvantaged young people in Europe

TitleImproving the quality of life of disadvantaged young people in Europe
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsAcconcia, G, Bonvin, J-M
EditorOtto, H-U, Egdell, V, Bonvin, J-M, Atzmüller, R, Kepler, J
Book TitleEmpowering Young People in Disempowering Times
Chapter15
Pagination251–262
PublisherEdward Elgar
Place PublishedCheltenham, UK
Abstract

Bonvin

Introduction: Empowering young people in disempowering times? Creating collaborative and transformative capabilities through participation

TitleIntroduction: Empowering young people in disempowering times? Creating collaborative and transformative capabilities through participation
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsOtto, H-U, Bonvin, J-M, Atzmüller, R
EditorOtto, H-U, Egdell, V, Bonvin, J-M, Atzmüller, R, Kepler, J
Book TitleEmpowering Young People in Disempowering Times
Pagination1–20
PublisherEdward Elgar
Place PublishedCheltenham, UK

The dynamics of youth policies in Switzerland: between participation and activation

TitleThe dynamics of youth policies in Switzerland: between participation and activation
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsDahmen, S, Bonvin, J-M, Beuret, B
EditorOtto, H-U, Egdell, V, Bonvin, J-M, Atzmüller, R, Kepler, J
Book TitleEmpowering Young People in Disempowering Times
Chapter8
Pagination144–159
PublisherEdward Elgar
Place PublishedCheltenham, UK

The impact of social isolation on pain interference: A longitudinal study

TitleThe impact of social isolation on pain interference: A longitudinal study
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsKarayannis, NV, Baumann, I, Sturgeon, JA, Melloh, M, Mackey, SC
JournalAnnals of Behavioral Medicine
ISSN0883-6612, 1532-4796
KeywordsChronic pain, Pain interference, Physical function, Social isolation
Abstract

Abstract
Background : Evidence suggests social interactions play an important role in pain perception. Purpose : The aim of this study was to determine whether
social isolation (SI) in people with persistent pain determines pain interference (PI) and physical function over time. Methods : Patients seeking care at a tertiary pain management referral center were administered the Patient Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS.) SI, PI, physical function, depression, and average pain intensity item banks at their initial consultation and subsequent visits as part of their routine clinical care. We used a post hoc simulation of an experiment using propensity score matching (n = 4,950) and carried out a cross-lagged longitudinal analysis (n = 312) of retrospective observational data. Results : Cross-lagged longitudinal analysis showed that SI predicted PI at the next time point, above and beyond the effects of pain intensity and covariates, but not vice versa. Conclusions : These data support the importance of SI as a factor in pain-related appraisal and coping and demonstrate that a comprehensive assessment of the individuals’ social context can provide a better understanding of the differential trajectories for a person living with pain. Our study provides evidence that the impact of pain is reduced in individuals who perceive a greater sense of inclusion from and engagement with others. This study enhances the understanding of how social factors affect pain and have implications for how the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions may be improved. Therapeutic interventions aimed at increasing social connection hold merit in reducing the impact of pain on engagement with activities.

URLhttps://academic.oup.com/abm/advance-article/doi/10.1093/abm/kay017/4969712
DOI10.1093/abm/kay017
Custom 1

{:status: Advance online publication}

Trajectories of vulnerability: A sequence-analytical approach

TitleTrajectories of vulnerability: A sequence-analytical approach
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsBühlmann, F
EditorTillmann, R, Voorpostel, M, Farago, P
Book TitleSocial Dynamics in Swiss Society
Series TitleLife Course Research and Social Policies
Pagination129–144
PublisherSpringer
Place PublishedCham, Switzerland
ISBN Number978-3-319-89556-7 978-3-319-89557-4
Abstract

A growing proportion of the European population faces situations of vulnerability. Stable employees feel more and more at risk of losing their job or of experiencing a deterioration of their employment situation (Gallie et al. 1998). The share of standard employment relationships are declining, whereas atypical and precarious employment is on the rise (Hipp et al. 2015). In addition, joblessness in different forms—invalidity insurance, social assistance, early retirement—has also grown in recent decades (Paugam 2005). One of the unresolved issues is the relative scope of these phenomena. First, the advocates of what we could call exclusion thesis contend that only a small and marginal group is touched by material poverty and that this deprivation is inherently accompanied by isolation and segregation (Paugam 2005). A second approach, most famously brought forward by Robert Castel (2002), contends that not only the margins but also the larger zones of the labour market are characterised by precariousness. In a third perspective, it is asserted that work, even in formerly prestigious and well-paid occupations, is less and less socially recognised (Bourdieu 2003; Paugam 2000).

URLhttps://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-89557-4_9
DOI10.1007/978-3-319-89557-4_9
Short TitleTrajectories of Vulnerability

Integrating who “we” are with what “we” (will not) stand for: A further extension of the social identity model of collective action

TitleIntegrating who “we” are with what “we” (will not) stand for: A further extension of the social identity model of collective action
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
Authorsvan Zomeren, M, Kutlaca, M, Turner-Zwinkels, F
JournalEuropean Review of Social Psychology
Volume29
Number1
Pagination122–160
ISSN1046-3283, 1479-277X
KeywordsCollective action; social protest; social identity; moral beliefs; politicisation; values; right violation
Abstract

Collective action refers to any action that individuals undertake as group members to pursue group goals such as social change. In this chapter, we
further extend the Social Identity Model of Collective Action (SIMCA) by including not just (politicised) identity but also moral motivations into its core, effectively integrating who “we” are with what “we” (will not) stand for. Conceptually, we utilise self-categorisation theory’s notion of normative fit to elaborate this special relationship between the moral and identity motivations for collective action. Empirically, we review two research projects (the experimental and survey-based Value-Identity Fit Project and the longitudinal Politicisation Project) that both suggest that the SIMCA needs to be extended to include, both conceptually and empirically, a broader range of (violated) moral beliefs and a focus on identity content. We discuss key implications of expanding the core of the SIMCA for the social psychology of collective action and social change, and suggest new directions for future theorising and research in this field.

URLhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10463283.2018.1479347
DOI10.1080/10463283.2018.1479347
Short TitleIntegrating who “we” are with what “we” (will not) stand for

Doping risk and career turning points in male elite road cycling (2005–2016)

TitleDoping risk and career turning points in male elite road cycling (2005–2016)
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsAubel, O, Lefèvre, B, Le Goff, J-M, Taverna, N
JournalJournal of Science and Medicine in Sport
ISSN14402440
URLhttps://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1440244018300707
DOI10.1016/j.jsams.2018.03.003

The transition to marriage for cohabiting couples: Does it shape subjective well-being and opinions or attitudes toward family?

TitleThe transition to marriage for cohabiting couples: Does it shape subjective well-being and opinions or attitudes toward family?
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsRyser, V-A, Le Goff, J-M
EditorTillmann, R, Voorpostel, M, Farago, P
Book TitleSocial Dynamics in Swiss Society: Empirical studies based on the Swiss Household Panel
Series TitleColl Life Course research and Social Policies.
Volume9
Pagination47–59
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Place PublishedCham-Heidelberg
ISBN Number978-3-319-89556-7
Abstract

Although marriage and cohabitation appear to be increasingly equivalent across Western countries, extensive research has demonstrated that married and cohabiting individuals still differ in terms of attitudes and well-being. Married people tend to express higher life satisfaction and more traditional opinions and values, whereas cohabiters tend to report more depressive symptoms and a more egalitarian division of tasks. Little is known about the roots of these differences. This study focus on the Swiss Household Panel subsample of respondents who lived together before they married. Its aim is to understand whether degrees of traditionalism and happiness might exist prior to marriage or, alternatively, whether it is the transition to marriage that implies changes in happiness and traditional values. Results tend to demonstrate that individuals have a high probability of responding similarly before and after the transition to marriage and validate the former hypothesis. However, results also show that the variables that play a key role before the marriage do not necessarily play the same role after. That means that marriage contributes to changing the way people assess different domains of their life as well as the hierarchy of the importance of the sociodemographic characteristics that influence individuals‘ subjective well-being, and opinions or attitudes toward family.

URLhttps://www.springer.com/de/book/9783319895567#otherversion=9783319895574
DOI10.1007/978-3-319-89557-4_4
Short TitleThe Transition to Marriage for Cohabiting Couple

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