Precarious work and the fertility intention-behavior link: An analysis based on the Swiss Household Panel data

TitlePrecarious work and the fertility intention-behavior link: An analysis based on the Swiss Household Panel data
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2012
AuthorsHanappi, D, Ryser, V-A, Bernardi, L, Le Goff, J-M
JournalLIVES Working Papers
Volume2012
Issue17
Pagination1-27
PublisherNCCR LIVES
Place PublishedLausanne
Type of ArticleResearch paper
ISSN2296-1658
Keywordseconomic uncertainty, fertility intentions, life course, panel data, precariousness, Switzerland
Abstract

The negative effect of economic uncertainty on people’s fertility decisions is well documented, yet most studies examine only structural factors, perceived work-related, and economic factors. We aim at extending the research in this field by including the role of precarious work (job insecurity, work control, and individuals’ financial situation) on the likelihood of positive fertility intentions. We use longitudinal data from the Swiss Household Panel (SHP 2002-2010) to run a set of multinomial logistic regression models of fertility intentions separately for men and women. We let socio-demographic characteristics mediate the effect of precarious work on fertility intentions in all models. Results indicate a gender-specific effect of work control on fertility intentions.

DOI10.12682/lives.2296-1658.2012.17
Citation Key633

Does unemployment hurt less if there is more of it around? A panel analysis of life satisfaction in Germany and Switzerland

TitleDoes unemployment hurt less if there is more of it around? A panel analysis of life satisfaction in Germany and Switzerland
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2012
AuthorsOesch, D, Lipps, O
JournalEuropean Sociological Review
Volume29
Issue5
Pagination955-967
ISSN0266-7215
Abstract

This article examines the existence of a habituation effect to unemployment: Does the subjective well-being of unemployed people decline less if unemployment is more widespread? The underlying idea is that unemployment hysteresis may operate through a sociological channel: if many people in the community lose their job and remain unemployed over an extended period, the psychological cost of being unemployed diminishes, and the pressure to accept a new job declines. We analyse this question with individual-level data from the German socio-economic panel (1984–2010) and the Swiss household panel (2000–2010). Our fixed-effects estimates show no evidence for a mitigating effect of high surrounding unemployment on the subjective well-being of the unemployed. Becoming unemployed hurts as much when regional unemployment is high as when it is low. Likewise, the strongly harmful impact of being unemployed on well-being neither wears off over time, nor do repeated episodes of unemployment make it any better. It thus appears doubtful that an unemployment shock becomes persistent because the unemployed becomes used to, and hence reasonably content with, being without a job.

DOI10.1093/esr/jcs071
Short TitleEuropean Sociological Review
Citation Key624
Refereed DesignationRefereed