The impact of co-residence trajectories on personal networks in the transition to adulthood: A comparative perspective

TitleThe impact of co-residence trajectories on personal networks in the transition to adulthood: A comparative perspective
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsAeby, G, Gauthier, J-A, Gouveia, R, Ramos, V, Wall, K
EditorCesnuityté, V, Lück, D, Widmer, E
Book TitleFamily continuity and change: Contemporary European perspectives
Series Title10.1057/978-1-137-59028-2_10
EditionFirst
Pagination211-242
PublisherPalgrave
Place PublishedBasingstoke, United Kingdom
Keywordsinternational comparison, life course, personal network, sequence analysis
Abstract

Over the life course, individuals develop personal networks which provide essential resources - sporadically or on a daily basis - such as instrumental, emotional, and informational support. Those personal networks are composed of family (primary and extended kin) and non-family ties (friends, colleagues, acquaintances) (Pahl & Spencer, 2004). The prominence of specific ties varies across the life course depending on life stages, transitions and events. Following the linked lives principles (Elder, Kirkpatrick Johnson, & Crosnoe, 2003), these transitions trigger changes in household composition, promoting different types of relational interdependency. The level of interdependency with some household members may have a cumulative effect by strengthening these bonds, whereas with others the effect may be more ephemeral and lead to the exclusion of these ties in current personal networks. Thus co-residence trajectories, such as the experience of growing up in a two or one-parent family, leaving the parental home early or late, moving in with a partner or living alone, becoming a parent, divorcing, etc., will differentially influence the composition of personal networks.

Citation Key2680
Refereed DesignationRefereed